A rare bit of good news for the GOP

A new study predicts that reapportionment in 2010 will add House seats in red states. Of course, by extension, this means the Electoral College will become slightly more favorable to GOP candidates. I guess friendly tax and pro-growth policies (and warm weather) eventually have political manifestations.

Josh Kraushaar writes in Politico:
The study, from the firm Election Data Services, projects that Texas will pick up three seats in Congress. Arizona, Florida, Georgia, Nevada and Utah would gain one seat each. Iowa, Louisiana, Massachusetts, Michigan, New Jersey, New York, Ohio and Pennsylvania would each lose one. ….

The EDS findings, based on 2008 Census Bureau population figures, show how seats would be apportioned if the 2010 reapportionment were to occur today. But the firm also conducted its own analysis, using current Census figures to extrapolate 2010 population numbers, and came up with another set of projections based on what state populations are likely to be in 2010.

 

A new study predicts that reapportionment in 2010 will add House seats in red states. Of course, by extension, this means the Electoral College will become slightly more favorable to GOP candidates. I guess friendly tax and pro-growth policies (and warm weather) eventually have political manifestations.

Josh Kraushaar writes in Politico:
The study, from the firm Election Data Services, projects that Texas will pick up three seats in Congress. Arizona, Florida, Georgia, Nevada and Utah would gain one seat each. Iowa, Louisiana, Massachusetts, Michigan, New Jersey, New York, Ohio and Pennsylvania would each lose one. ….

The EDS findings, based on 2008 Census Bureau population figures, show how seats would be apportioned if the 2010 reapportionment were to occur today. But the firm also conducted its own analysis, using current Census figures to extrapolate 2010 population numbers, and came up with another set of projections based on what state populations are likely to be in 2010.