It's Gingrich vs. Steele for RNC Chair

Rick Moran
Looks like a win-win situation to me. Gingrich has moderated his image somewhat if not his policy positions. Recently, the former speaker has been advocating working with Democrats and independents to solve problems like health care and entitlements. He would bring to bear what I believe to be the finest conservative political mind today on the problems of the party and conservatism as an ideology.

Steele's no slouch either.  He headed up Gingrich's creation, GOPAC, which raised money  as well as identifying GOP candidates for office. Steele is former LT. Governor of Maryland and a proven vote getter in a blue state. He also happens to be black which may sway some in the party who wish to see a different face leading the GOP.

The Washington Times reports:

A behind-the-scenes battle to take the reins of the Republican National Committee is taking off between former House Speaker Newt Gingrich and former Maryland Lt. Gov. Michael S. Steele.

Neither man will acknowledge his interest in the post, but Republicans close to each are burning up the phone lines and firing off e-mails to fellow party members in an effort to oust RNC Chairman Mike Duncan in the wake of the second consecutive drubbing of Republican candidates at the polls.

A bevy of backers for each man, neither of whom is an RNC member, say the committee needs a leader who can formulate a counter-agenda to President-elect Barack Obama's administration and articulate it on the national stage.

"The Republican National Committee has to ask itself if it wants someone who has successfully led a revolution," Randy Evans, Gingrich confidant and personal attorney based in Atlanta, told The Washington Times on Monday. "If it does, Newt's the one."

Former California Republican Party Chairman Shawn Steel told The Times that Mr. Steele, chairman of GOPAC, a national organization once headed by Mr. Gingrich, "wants to be Republican national chairman."

"I've talked to him many times, and he definitely wants it," said Mr. Steel.



There is probably no one in the party who has thought longer and harder about how to translate conservative ideas into governing solutions than Gingrich. The RNC chair would be a good fit for him but I worry that the more mundane aspects of the job would bore him.


Steele has also been in the forefront of the reform movement but I question his success in candidate recruitment (the GOP lost 25 of 28 Republican held open seats) and is more a moderate in some respects than Gingrich. However, there is no doubting his ability to raise tons of money as well as being a charismatic front man who would do well as a national spokesman for the party.

Party chairmen are generally very conservative so I am expecting Gingrich to get the nod - if he truly wants it. If not, I wouldn't be too disappointed if the job went to Steele.

Looks like a win-win situation to me. Gingrich has moderated his image somewhat if not his policy positions. Recently, the former speaker has been advocating working with Democrats and independents to solve problems like health care and entitlements. He would bring to bear what I believe to be the finest conservative political mind today on the problems of the party and conservatism as an ideology.

Steele's no slouch either.  He headed up Gingrich's creation, GOPAC, which raised money  as well as identifying GOP candidates for office. Steele is former LT. Governor of Maryland and a proven vote getter in a blue state. He also happens to be black which may sway some in the party who wish to see a different face leading the GOP.

The Washington Times reports:

A behind-the-scenes battle to take the reins of the Republican National Committee is taking off between former House Speaker Newt Gingrich and former Maryland Lt. Gov. Michael S. Steele.

Neither man will acknowledge his interest in the post, but Republicans close to each are burning up the phone lines and firing off e-mails to fellow party members in an effort to oust RNC Chairman Mike Duncan in the wake of the second consecutive drubbing of Republican candidates at the polls.

A bevy of backers for each man, neither of whom is an RNC member, say the committee needs a leader who can formulate a counter-agenda to President-elect Barack Obama's administration and articulate it on the national stage.

"The Republican National Committee has to ask itself if it wants someone who has successfully led a revolution," Randy Evans, Gingrich confidant and personal attorney based in Atlanta, told The Washington Times on Monday. "If it does, Newt's the one."

Former California Republican Party Chairman Shawn Steel told The Times that Mr. Steele, chairman of GOPAC, a national organization once headed by Mr. Gingrich, "wants to be Republican national chairman."

"I've talked to him many times, and he definitely wants it," said Mr. Steel.



There is probably no one in the party who has thought longer and harder about how to translate conservative ideas into governing solutions than Gingrich. The RNC chair would be a good fit for him but I worry that the more mundane aspects of the job would bore him.


Steele has also been in the forefront of the reform movement but I question his success in candidate recruitment (the GOP lost 25 of 28 Republican held open seats) and is more a moderate in some respects than Gingrich. However, there is no doubting his ability to raise tons of money as well as being a charismatic front man who would do well as a national spokesman for the party.

Party chairmen are generally very conservative so I am expecting Gingrich to get the nod - if he truly wants it. If not, I wouldn't be too disappointed if the job went to Steele.