German students trash Holocaust exhibit in Berlin

Thomas Lifson
In a shocking incident that somehow escaped much notice in the American media, rampaging German students vandalized an exhibit at Berlin's Humboldt University commemorating the persecution of Jewish business owners by the Nazis. John Rosenthal reports in Pajamas Media:

Last Wednesday, hundreds, if not thousands, of students ostensibly protesting poor conditions in German schools stormed the main building of Berlin's historic Humboldt University: smashing windows, occupying seminar rooms, strewing rolls of toilet paper in the lobby and courtyard, and even setting at least one fire. Most astonishingly, the protesters also laid waste to an exhibit in the entry hall of the building devoted to the Nazi persecution of the Jews. The exhibit was titled "Betrayed and Sold: Jewish Businesses in Berlin 1933-1945."

The incident occurred just three days after the solemn commemoration of the 70th anniuversary of Kristallnacht, the night of violence that began the nightmare phase of Nazi persecution of Jews. Chancellor Angela Merkel participated, continuing the honorable German tradition of remembering the crimes of the Nazis. However, one more generation hence, one wonders what Germany's attitude will be toward the crimes of the Nazis.
In a shocking incident that somehow escaped much notice in the American media, rampaging German students vandalized an exhibit at Berlin's Humboldt University commemorating the persecution of Jewish business owners by the Nazis. John Rosenthal reports in Pajamas Media:

Last Wednesday, hundreds, if not thousands, of students ostensibly protesting poor conditions in German schools stormed the main building of Berlin's historic Humboldt University: smashing windows, occupying seminar rooms, strewing rolls of toilet paper in the lobby and courtyard, and even setting at least one fire. Most astonishingly, the protesters also laid waste to an exhibit in the entry hall of the building devoted to the Nazi persecution of the Jews. The exhibit was titled "Betrayed and Sold: Jewish Businesses in Berlin 1933-1945."

The incident occurred just three days after the solemn commemoration of the 70th anniuversary of Kristallnacht, the night of violence that began the nightmare phase of Nazi persecution of Jews. Chancellor Angela Merkel participated, continuing the honorable German tradition of remembering the crimes of the Nazis. However, one more generation hence, one wonders what Germany's attitude will be toward the crimes of the Nazis.