Does MN Secretary of State understand the election laws he is charged with enforcing?

Rick Moran
Judging by a talk Mark Ritchie had with the Weekly Standard's John McCormack, the Minnestoa Secretary of State is a little fuzzy on the details of election law in his state.

McCormack asked how ballots in the Coleman-Franken race are being secured:

During an interview with Minnesota secretary of state Mark Ritchie on Wednesday afternoon, I asked him what protections are in place to prevent ballot tampering in the Coleman-Franken Senate race. "All ballots are in the control of election officials. All ballots are carried with two election judges of different parties," he said. "The state law is clear. These [ballots] are under lock and key. Ballots moved with election judges of both parties."

In fact, Ritchie's statement that Minnesota law requires ballots to move with two election judges of both parties is incorrect. Later in the day on Wednesday, I spoke with Matt Stevens, an election judge from St. Paul. Stevens, a 30 year-old musician in the reggae band New Primitives and a self-described political independent, told me that he alone moved the ballots from his St. Paul precinct to the county office. Stevens didn't do anything illegal. Minnesota law states: "One or more of the election judges in each precinct shall" transport ballots (emphasis mine).

Considering that there are hundreds of disputed ballots where a decision must be made whether or not to count them, it would be nice of the guy in charge of that recount had a familiarity with what the law says about the issue.

But then, that might be asking too much of a George Soros lackey.

Hat Tip: Ed Lasky




Judging by a talk Mark Ritchie had with the Weekly Standard's John McCormack, the Minnestoa Secretary of State is a little fuzzy on the details of election law in his state.

McCormack asked how ballots in the Coleman-Franken race are being secured:

During an interview with Minnesota secretary of state Mark Ritchie on Wednesday afternoon, I asked him what protections are in place to prevent ballot tampering in the Coleman-Franken Senate race. "All ballots are in the control of election officials. All ballots are carried with two election judges of different parties," he said. "The state law is clear. These [ballots] are under lock and key. Ballots moved with election judges of both parties."

In fact, Ritchie's statement that Minnesota law requires ballots to move with two election judges of both parties is incorrect. Later in the day on Wednesday, I spoke with Matt Stevens, an election judge from St. Paul. Stevens, a 30 year-old musician in the reggae band New Primitives and a self-described political independent, told me that he alone moved the ballots from his St. Paul precinct to the county office. Stevens didn't do anything illegal. Minnesota law states: "One or more of the election judges in each precinct shall" transport ballots (emphasis mine).

Considering that there are hundreds of disputed ballots where a decision must be made whether or not to count them, it would be nice of the guy in charge of that recount had a familiarity with what the law says about the issue.

But then, that might be asking too much of a George Soros lackey.

Hat Tip: Ed Lasky