AT Writers at Pajamas Media

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Two American Thinker writers - News Director Ed Lasky and frequent contributor Clarice Feldman - have articles featured today at Pajamas Media.

Both pieces deal with what a potential Obama Administration would look like.

Ed Lasky trains his eagle eye on Obama's foreign policy team -a subject for which he has garnered a considerable amount of notice in both the mainstream press and blogs. His eye opening article on the number of Obama advisors who are board members or who work for the George Soros-funded NGO the International Crisis Group and that group's anti-Israel, blame America first bias.

A sampling from Ed's piece::

The ICG is formally based in Brussels but has offices around the world (Washington, D.C., of course, is a major office). These offices are prominent in various “hot spots” in Asia, Africa, and the Middle East since the stated mission of the group is “conflict resolution.” Indeed, the group might be considered a proto-State Department. It has a roster of foreign policy analysts who travel throughout the world, meeting with political and other leaders to try to bring about “change.”

This group also has ties to Barack Obama. One of its major donors is prominent Obama supporter George Soros, who received a “Founders Award” from the ICG. He also serves on its board and executive committee. Indeed, the ICG was founded by former UN official Mark Malloch Brown, whose involvement in the oil-for-food scandal and close ties to George Soros were controversial enough to merit editorials in the Wall Street Journal and other media outlets.

One of the first foreign policy gurus who advised Barack Obama was Zbigniew Brzezinski, Jimmy Carter’s national security adviser during the disastrous era that led to the empowerment of the radical Shiite regime in Iran. Brzezinski serves on the board of the ICG. Wesley Clark, former NATO supreme allied commander and an Obama surrogate during the campaign, also serves on the board.

The foreign policy guru closest to Barack Obama is Samantha Power , who was forced from the campaign for making disparaging remarks about Hilly Clinton. She has, at various times, stated she expects to serve in a prominent position in an Obama administration. Power is a member of the executive committee of the ICG.


Clarice Feldman used her knowledge and expertise about the Justice Department to illuminate some of the issues and personalities that might shape how DOJ will do its job in an Obama Administration:

At the lowest staffing levels, Obama will be luckier than his last two predecessors. While it hasn’t gotten as much attention as other businesses, major law firms are going under, many young partners and associates are facing layoffs and dismissals, hiring is down, and the huge salary disparities between private and public employment may seem a less significant drawback to public service than it has been for decades. On the other hand, there is likely to be less tax revenues available to fund any of the presidents-elect’s more ambitious undertakings. So he may have a shot at better staffing, but at the cost of more large programmatic shifts.

The Department of Justice is composed of 61 different agencies, some of which (like the solicitor general’s office) have very defined, non-political roles and will continue on with only minor changes, if any. Others are highly political like the Civil Rights Division, and it will be as interesting to see who is selected to head that and similar departments as it is to see who is nominated for the attorney general slot.

Up until now Obama has operated as something of a cipher, with all sides projecting on to his blank screen how they think he will come down among the various competing interests. Now he has to decide, and we’ve not much in the way of solid clues to help us puzzle this out.

Both articles are well worth your time.



Two American Thinker writers - News Director Ed Lasky and frequent contributor Clarice Feldman - have articles featured today at Pajamas Media.

Both pieces deal with what a potential Obama Administration would look like.

Ed Lasky trains his eagle eye on Obama's foreign policy team -a subject for which he has garnered a considerable amount of notice in both the mainstream press and blogs. His eye opening article on the number of Obama advisors who are board members or who work for the George Soros-funded NGO the International Crisis Group and that group's anti-Israel, blame America first bias.

A sampling from Ed's piece::

The ICG is formally based in Brussels but has offices around the world (Washington, D.C., of course, is a major office). These offices are prominent in various “hot spots” in Asia, Africa, and the Middle East since the stated mission of the group is “conflict resolution.” Indeed, the group might be considered a proto-State Department. It has a roster of foreign policy analysts who travel throughout the world, meeting with political and other leaders to try to bring about “change.”

This group also has ties to Barack Obama. One of its major donors is prominent Obama supporter George Soros, who received a “Founders Award” from the ICG. He also serves on its board and executive committee. Indeed, the ICG was founded by former UN official Mark Malloch Brown, whose involvement in the oil-for-food scandal and close ties to George Soros were controversial enough to merit editorials in the Wall Street Journal and other media outlets.

One of the first foreign policy gurus who advised Barack Obama was Zbigniew Brzezinski, Jimmy Carter’s national security adviser during the disastrous era that led to the empowerment of the radical Shiite regime in Iran. Brzezinski serves on the board of the ICG. Wesley Clark, former NATO supreme allied commander and an Obama surrogate during the campaign, also serves on the board.

The foreign policy guru closest to Barack Obama is Samantha Power , who was forced from the campaign for making disparaging remarks about Hilly Clinton. She has, at various times, stated she expects to serve in a prominent position in an Obama administration. Power is a member of the executive committee of the ICG.


Clarice Feldman used her knowledge and expertise about the Justice Department to illuminate some of the issues and personalities that might shape how DOJ will do its job in an Obama Administration:

At the lowest staffing levels, Obama will be luckier than his last two predecessors. While it hasn’t gotten as much attention as other businesses, major law firms are going under, many young partners and associates are facing layoffs and dismissals, hiring is down, and the huge salary disparities between private and public employment may seem a less significant drawback to public service than it has been for decades. On the other hand, there is likely to be less tax revenues available to fund any of the presidents-elect’s more ambitious undertakings. So he may have a shot at better staffing, but at the cost of more large programmatic shifts.

The Department of Justice is composed of 61 different agencies, some of which (like the solicitor general’s office) have very defined, non-political roles and will continue on with only minor changes, if any. Others are highly political like the Civil Rights Division, and it will be as interesting to see who is selected to head that and similar departments as it is to see who is nominated for the attorney general slot.

Up until now Obama has operated as something of a cipher, with all sides projecting on to his blank screen how they think he will come down among the various competing interests. Now he has to decide, and we’ve not much in the way of solid clues to help us puzzle this out.

Both articles are well worth your time.