American Thinker Congratulates WGN Radio host Milt Rosenberg

An American Thinker editorial
Legendary WGN radio talk show host Milt Rosenberg was one of the recipients of this year's National Humanities Medal awarded by the President during a ceremony held at the White House. Milt has been broadcasting stimulating talk shows for decades and has featured a wide range of guests from a variety of fields. When he has shows on politics, he is very conscientious about taking a bipartisan approach: inviting speakers who are both Democrats and Repubicans. He has been kind enough to host American Thinker editors Richard Baehr and Ed Lasky.

He is also fearless. During the campaign season he hosted two guests who scrutinized Barack Obama's career: David Freddoso and Stanley Kurtz. For his labors, he was rewarded with a barrage of emails and phone calls in an effort launched by Obama's campaign to chill the exercise of free speech (when it comes to inquiries about Barack Obama, at least). This despite the fact that Milt had invited representatives from the Obama campaign to appear on the show with his guests.

This was symbolic of his career; find interesting guests, prompt public discussion on a myriad of issues, and ensure fairness by hosting guests with diverse views.

Milt has been unfailingly courteous to his guests and has been a strong supporter of American Thinker. In turn ,we are big admirers of him.

From an article in Media-Newsire about  Milt's award:

Milton J. Rosenberg is being recognized "for bringing the world of ideas to millions of listeners. Combining a scholar's understanding and a teacher's openness, he has made a home in radio for elevated conversation and profound thought."

The National Humanities Medal, first awarded in 1989 as the Charles Frankel Prize, honors individuals or groups whose work has deepened the nation's understanding of the humanities, broadened our citizens' engagement with the humanities, or helped preserve and expand Americans' access to important resources in the humanities.

The Humanities Medal is the most prestigious award in the humanities. Over the last decade, including this year's recipients, the National Humanities Medal has been awarded to only 107 individuals and 9 organizations. Among those recognized during this time period are Bernard Lewis, Judith "Miss Manners" Martin, Madeleine L'Engle, Harvey Mansfield, and John Updike.

Congratulations, Milt Rosenberg, for an award well-deserved.

Legendary WGN radio talk show host Milt Rosenberg was one of the recipients of this year's National Humanities Medal awarded by the President during a ceremony held at the White House. Milt has been broadcasting stimulating talk shows for decades and has featured a wide range of guests from a variety of fields. When he has shows on politics, he is very conscientious about taking a bipartisan approach: inviting speakers who are both Democrats and Repubicans. He has been kind enough to host American Thinker editors Richard Baehr and Ed Lasky.

He is also fearless. During the campaign season he hosted two guests who scrutinized Barack Obama's career: David Freddoso and Stanley Kurtz. For his labors, he was rewarded with a barrage of emails and phone calls in an effort launched by Obama's campaign to chill the exercise of free speech (when it comes to inquiries about Barack Obama, at least). This despite the fact that Milt had invited representatives from the Obama campaign to appear on the show with his guests.

This was symbolic of his career; find interesting guests, prompt public discussion on a myriad of issues, and ensure fairness by hosting guests with diverse views.

Milt has been unfailingly courteous to his guests and has been a strong supporter of American Thinker. In turn ,we are big admirers of him.

From an article in Media-Newsire about  Milt's award:

Milton J. Rosenberg is being recognized "for bringing the world of ideas to millions of listeners. Combining a scholar's understanding and a teacher's openness, he has made a home in radio for elevated conversation and profound thought."

The National Humanities Medal, first awarded in 1989 as the Charles Frankel Prize, honors individuals or groups whose work has deepened the nation's understanding of the humanities, broadened our citizens' engagement with the humanities, or helped preserve and expand Americans' access to important resources in the humanities.

The Humanities Medal is the most prestigious award in the humanities. Over the last decade, including this year's recipients, the National Humanities Medal has been awarded to only 107 individuals and 9 organizations. Among those recognized during this time period are Bernard Lewis, Judith "Miss Manners" Martin, Madeleine L'Engle, Harvey Mansfield, and John Updike.

Congratulations, Milt Rosenberg, for an award well-deserved.