A Bailout for Democrat constituents?

William D. Zeranski
Michigan went to Obama, and so did Illinois, as did a number of other states which are home to car making. I was wondering how the Big Three's manufacturing facilities layout over the electoral map.  A few links are available, which offer a rough outline of where Ford and GM plants are located.

I couldn't find one for Chrysler, but Chrysler has its base in what is known as the DaimlerChrysler Auburn Hills Complex headquartered in Michigan, and again, we know which way those 17 Electoral College votes will go. 

So, how does helping bailout the Big Three help the GOP?   Recently the Big Three and the United Auto Workers union president walked, hand in hand, up to a Democrat-controlled Congress, with their two free hands out, looking for money:

The three car firm bosses -- who will be joined by the president of the United Auto Workers union -- are facing a furious fight to sway Republican support for their request. Democrats have set the stage for a pivotal Senate vote on Wednesday on a plan that combines the $25bn with a $6bn extension of unemployment benefits for laid-off US workers.

They're looking for a lot of money, and the Republicans may not be interested in being associated with another multi-billion dollar deal, which could easily turn into another bailout debacle.

When it comes to the rank and file union member, no one knows how the average worker votes, but the safe bet is the majority generally pull the ‘D' lever.  That was true before the election and after, and there's no reason to believe that will change. 

The United Auto Workers union is part of the Democrat base.  GOP knows that.  The union president knows that.  If the Big Three must cut their workforce to survive, that's a reality the Democrats have to face.  The mid-term elections will come fast and furious and unemployed union workers will scare them more than the Republicans. 
Michigan went to Obama, and so did Illinois, as did a number of other states which are home to car making. I was wondering how the Big Three's manufacturing facilities layout over the electoral map.  A few links are available, which offer a rough outline of where Ford and GM plants are located.

I couldn't find one for Chrysler, but Chrysler has its base in what is known as the DaimlerChrysler Auburn Hills Complex headquartered in Michigan, and again, we know which way those 17 Electoral College votes will go. 

So, how does helping bailout the Big Three help the GOP?   Recently the Big Three and the United Auto Workers union president walked, hand in hand, up to a Democrat-controlled Congress, with their two free hands out, looking for money:

The three car firm bosses -- who will be joined by the president of the United Auto Workers union -- are facing a furious fight to sway Republican support for their request. Democrats have set the stage for a pivotal Senate vote on Wednesday on a plan that combines the $25bn with a $6bn extension of unemployment benefits for laid-off US workers.

They're looking for a lot of money, and the Republicans may not be interested in being associated with another multi-billion dollar deal, which could easily turn into another bailout debacle.

When it comes to the rank and file union member, no one knows how the average worker votes, but the safe bet is the majority generally pull the ‘D' lever.  That was true before the election and after, and there's no reason to believe that will change. 

The United Auto Workers union is part of the Democrat base.  GOP knows that.  The union president knows that.  If the Big Three must cut their workforce to survive, that's a reality the Democrats have to face.  The mid-term elections will come fast and furious and unemployed union workers will scare them more than the Republicans.