Which candidate is the uniter?

We’ve come a long way since the days when Obama was going to reach across the aisle and get things done. He confesses: “I don’t think me calling House Republican members would have been that helpful, I tend not to be that persuasive on that side of the aisle.”

Because he’s a divider and
not a uniter?

John McCain, on the other hand:

Sen. John McCain's record of working with Democrats easily outstrips Sen. Barack Obama's efforts with Republicans, according to an analysis by The Washington Times of their legislative records. Whether looking at bills they have led on or bills they have signed onto, Mr. McCain has reached across the aisle far more frequently and with more members than Mr. Obama since the latter came to the Senate in 2005.

In fact, by several measures, Mr. McCain has been more likely to team up with Democrats than with members of his own party. Democrats made up 55 percent of his political partners over the last two Congresses, including on the tough issues of campaign finance and global warming. For Mr. Obama, Republicans were only 13 percent of his co-sponsors during his time in the Senate, and he had his biggest bipartisan successes on noncontroversial measures, such as issuing a postage stamp in honor of civil rights icon Rosa Parks.


I wonder if anyone is going to ask Obama about that statement at the next debate?
We’ve come a long way since the days when Obama was going to reach across the aisle and get things done. He confesses: “I don’t think me calling House Republican members would have been that helpful, I tend not to be that persuasive on that side of the aisle.”

Because he’s a divider and
not a uniter?

John McCain, on the other hand:

Sen. John McCain's record of working with Democrats easily outstrips Sen. Barack Obama's efforts with Republicans, according to an analysis by The Washington Times of their legislative records. Whether looking at bills they have led on or bills they have signed onto, Mr. McCain has reached across the aisle far more frequently and with more members than Mr. Obama since the latter came to the Senate in 2005.

In fact, by several measures, Mr. McCain has been more likely to team up with Democrats than with members of his own party. Democrats made up 55 percent of his political partners over the last two Congresses, including on the tough issues of campaign finance and global warming. For Mr. Obama, Republicans were only 13 percent of his co-sponsors during his time in the Senate, and he had his biggest bipartisan successes on noncontroversial measures, such as issuing a postage stamp in honor of civil rights icon Rosa Parks.


I wonder if anyone is going to ask Obama about that statement at the next debate?