Wealthy leftists spread their influence while despising those they manipulate

Evidence has been found of the contempt with which the elite left regards those whom they manipulate to gain power for themselves and their puppets. 

A network of wealthy leftists using their money to support organizations like Media Matters and MoveOn has been operating for some time at the national level. Names like George Soros, Peter Lewis of Progressive Insurance, and Herbert and Marion Sandler are familiar to many AT readers.

On the state level, similar networks operate. In Colorado, a remarkable story in the Denver Post described one such network. Jessica Fender wrote:

Colorado's best-known progressive donors are advancing their political and ideological agenda through a web of advocacy and nonprofit groups, many of which claim nonpartisanship and receive tax exemptions.

The 37 organizations that collectively receive millions at the direction of the Colorado Democracy Alliance (CoDA) serve unique purposes in the progressive power brokers' toolbox.

They build voting blocs, provide policy research, shape media communications, train progressive leaders or encourage civic engagement, according to the alliance's organizing documents.

CoDA executive director Laurie Zeller laid out a bit of the largely secretive alliance's game plan at a meeting at the Democratic National Convention.

Read the whole story, and then consider this even more remarkable story from Jessica Fender of the Denver Post today.

The former intern who leaked documents detailing the Colorado Democracy Alliance's strategy and funding stepped forward this week to vouch for their authenticity, including that of a disputed memo referring to minorities and high-school dropouts as "idiots."

The CDA denies the document is authentic:

Mark Grueskin, legal adviser for the Colorado Democracy Alliance, on Monday challenged Smith's credibility and maintained that the "idiots" memo - also chock-full of cloak-and-dagger language - is a forgery.

The document, which became a campaign tool with which to beat up Democrats after it was published on a conservative news site, uses such terms as "HIGH-COVERT," "Imbedded Media Ops" and "rendezvous" to describe the group's operations and meetings.

The organization denies the authenticity of the document:

"No one associated with the Colorado Democracy Alliance is responsible for the memo that has caused this stir. For starters, only a character in a 1940s spy novel would use (that) language," said Grueskin, who has authenticated many other leaked documents outlining the alliance's structure. "There is just one person who says this memo is authentic."

There should be no obstacle for the well-funded group taking the leaker to court on a defamation lawsuit. Yet they have no plans to do so:

Grueskin said he believes there are legal options open to the alliance in this case but that to his knowledge, no one has suggested pursuing them.

Going forward with a lawsuit would open their files for discovery, of course. If this group really believes it has been defamed, it would have nothing to fear.
Evidence has been found of the contempt with which the elite left regards those whom they manipulate to gain power for themselves and their puppets. 

A network of wealthy leftists using their money to support organizations like Media Matters and MoveOn has been operating for some time at the national level. Names like George Soros, Peter Lewis of Progressive Insurance, and Herbert and Marion Sandler are familiar to many AT readers.

On the state level, similar networks operate. In Colorado, a remarkable story in the Denver Post described one such network. Jessica Fender wrote:

Colorado's best-known progressive donors are advancing their political and ideological agenda through a web of advocacy and nonprofit groups, many of which claim nonpartisanship and receive tax exemptions.

The 37 organizations that collectively receive millions at the direction of the Colorado Democracy Alliance (CoDA) serve unique purposes in the progressive power brokers' toolbox.

They build voting blocs, provide policy research, shape media communications, train progressive leaders or encourage civic engagement, according to the alliance's organizing documents.

CoDA executive director Laurie Zeller laid out a bit of the largely secretive alliance's game plan at a meeting at the Democratic National Convention.

Read the whole story, and then consider this even more remarkable story from Jessica Fender of the Denver Post today.

The former intern who leaked documents detailing the Colorado Democracy Alliance's strategy and funding stepped forward this week to vouch for their authenticity, including that of a disputed memo referring to minorities and high-school dropouts as "idiots."

The CDA denies the document is authentic:

Mark Grueskin, legal adviser for the Colorado Democracy Alliance, on Monday challenged Smith's credibility and maintained that the "idiots" memo - also chock-full of cloak-and-dagger language - is a forgery.

The document, which became a campaign tool with which to beat up Democrats after it was published on a conservative news site, uses such terms as "HIGH-COVERT," "Imbedded Media Ops" and "rendezvous" to describe the group's operations and meetings.

The organization denies the authenticity of the document:

"No one associated with the Colorado Democracy Alliance is responsible for the memo that has caused this stir. For starters, only a character in a 1940s spy novel would use (that) language," said Grueskin, who has authenticated many other leaked documents outlining the alliance's structure. "There is just one person who says this memo is authentic."

There should be no obstacle for the well-funded group taking the leaker to court on a defamation lawsuit. Yet they have no plans to do so:

Grueskin said he believes there are legal options open to the alliance in this case but that to his knowledge, no one has suggested pursuing them.

Going forward with a lawsuit would open their files for discovery, of course. If this group really believes it has been defamed, it would have nothing to fear.