Advice for McCain from The Economist

The author of the famous "Lexington" column in The Economist has some interesting advice for John McCain. Read the whole thing, but here are some key points:
Instead of Bill Ayers, Jeremiah Wright and the rest of the gang, Mr McCain should focus relentlessly on three plausible criticisms of Mr Obama.

First:

Mr McCain should point out that his opponent is one of the least business-friendly Democratic candidates in a generation.

Second:

Mr McCain should hammer away at the dangers of single-party rule in Washington, DC. The Democrats are likely to add at least another ten seats, and perhaps as many as 20, to their majority in the House... This will allow them to push through a wish-list of Democratic proposals on everything from "fair trade" to spending.
Third:

Mr McCain should point out that his opponent has never once in his career said boo to a Democratic goose. In Chicago he got on well with everybody, from the local teachers' unions to the Daley political machine. In the Senate he has voted with his party 97% of the time. He toes the most liberal line on late-term and partial-birth abortion. Even a highly experienced Democratic president with a record of bucking his party would find it hard to tame a large Democratic majority in Congress. A neophyte with a record of going along to get along could find it impossible.

In conclusion:

 "Vote for me to avoid the Democratic deluge" is not the most inspiring political platform in the world. But it is the only plausible one Mr McCain has left.



Hat tip: Elwin Tobing

The author of the famous "Lexington" column in The Economist has some interesting advice for John McCain. Read the whole thing, but here are some key points:
Instead of Bill Ayers, Jeremiah Wright and the rest of the gang, Mr McCain should focus relentlessly on three plausible criticisms of Mr Obama.

First:

Mr McCain should point out that his opponent is one of the least business-friendly Democratic candidates in a generation.

Second:

Mr McCain should hammer away at the dangers of single-party rule in Washington, DC. The Democrats are likely to add at least another ten seats, and perhaps as many as 20, to their majority in the House... This will allow them to push through a wish-list of Democratic proposals on everything from "fair trade" to spending.
Third:

Mr McCain should point out that his opponent has never once in his career said boo to a Democratic goose. In Chicago he got on well with everybody, from the local teachers' unions to the Daley political machine. In the Senate he has voted with his party 97% of the time. He toes the most liberal line on late-term and partial-birth abortion. Even a highly experienced Democratic president with a record of bucking his party would find it hard to tame a large Democratic majority in Congress. A neophyte with a record of going along to get along could find it impossible.

In conclusion:

 "Vote for me to avoid the Democratic deluge" is not the most inspiring political platform in the world. But it is the only plausible one Mr McCain has left.



Hat tip: Elwin Tobing