NYT admits its writer intentionally lied

The "Corrections" column of the New York Times today contains an extraordinary admission that one of its writers deliberately misrepresented a study and misquoted a source:

An article in the Itineraries pages last Tuesday reported about the increasing stress on business travelers, and cited the findings of "Stress in America," an annual survey of the American Psychological Association. That survey found that economic factors were the leading causes of stress levels in 2008, but it did not say, as the article did, that "the crisis on Wall Street was the No. 1 cause of anxiety," nor did participants in the survey say they felt most vulnerable to stress "in the office and on a business trip."

The survey included data from Sept. 19 to Sept. 23, 2008, a period of volatility on Wall Street, but none of the questions in the association's survey referred to Wall Street or any economic crises. Participants were not asked how business travel affected their stress levels or where they felt most vulnerable to stress. The author of the article distorted the survey's findings to fit his theme, contrary to The Times's standards of integrity.

The article also quoted incorrectly from a comment by Nancy Molitor, a psychologist in Wilmette, Ill., who told the author that, "In my 20 years of practice I've never seen such anxiety among my patients," not "among my banking and business patients." While Dr. Molitor does have patients in banking and business, she did not single them out as being more anxious than her other patients. (Go to Article)

Gawker notes that the writer in question, Paul Burnham Finney, is a freelancer. AT contributor David Paulin wonders how much of the NYT is now freelancer-written; he suspects quite a lot, given the number of layoffs.

Hat tip: David Paulin
The "Corrections" column of the New York Times today contains an extraordinary admission that one of its writers deliberately misrepresented a study and misquoted a source:

An article in the Itineraries pages last Tuesday reported about the increasing stress on business travelers, and cited the findings of "Stress in America," an annual survey of the American Psychological Association. That survey found that economic factors were the leading causes of stress levels in 2008, but it did not say, as the article did, that "the crisis on Wall Street was the No. 1 cause of anxiety," nor did participants in the survey say they felt most vulnerable to stress "in the office and on a business trip."

The survey included data from Sept. 19 to Sept. 23, 2008, a period of volatility on Wall Street, but none of the questions in the association's survey referred to Wall Street or any economic crises. Participants were not asked how business travel affected their stress levels or where they felt most vulnerable to stress. The author of the article distorted the survey's findings to fit his theme, contrary to The Times's standards of integrity.

The article also quoted incorrectly from a comment by Nancy Molitor, a psychologist in Wilmette, Ill., who told the author that, "In my 20 years of practice I've never seen such anxiety among my patients," not "among my banking and business patients." While Dr. Molitor does have patients in banking and business, she did not single them out as being more anxious than her other patients. (Go to Article)

Gawker notes that the writer in question, Paul Burnham Finney, is a freelancer. AT contributor David Paulin wonders how much of the NYT is now freelancer-written; he suspects quite a lot, given the number of layoffs.

Hat tip: David Paulin