Lieberman's Carpe Diem Time Has Come

Kyle-Anne Shiver & Lee Cary
Although Colin Powell’s endorsement of Barack Obama is no surprise, it does have some impact on the election.  Now it’s Lieberman’s turn to match that impact.

Senator Lieberman has been, as we know, an up-front, literally, supporter of John McCain.  At the same time, he’s kept a toe in the Democratic Party by retaining his Democrat seniority position as chair of the Senate’s Homeland Security and Governmental Affairs Committee.

If Obama wins the election, Joe the Plumber will be joined by another “Joe.”  Joe the Outcast.  Lieberman has to know he’ll be summarily drummed out of the Democrat corps in retribution for his support of McCain.  Democrat loyalist Senator Carl Levin (Michigan) will replace him.

The impact of the Democratic Party’s 2000 candidate for Vice President, who received more tallied votes than Dick Cheney, changing parties would match the impact of Colin Powell’s abandonment of the Republican Party that made his career.

Plus, it would give Lieberman a one-day platform to make a powerful statement as to why he supports McCain and not Powell’s “transformational” favorite. Leaving behind a long-time political party affiliation would be a brave and decisive move.

So, Senator Lieberman, sir, it’s carpe diem time.  Abandon ship, before they make you walk the plank.
Although Colin Powell’s endorsement of Barack Obama is no surprise, it does have some impact on the election.  Now it’s Lieberman’s turn to match that impact.

Senator Lieberman has been, as we know, an up-front, literally, supporter of John McCain.  At the same time, he’s kept a toe in the Democratic Party by retaining his Democrat seniority position as chair of the Senate’s Homeland Security and Governmental Affairs Committee.

If Obama wins the election, Joe the Plumber will be joined by another “Joe.”  Joe the Outcast.  Lieberman has to know he’ll be summarily drummed out of the Democrat corps in retribution for his support of McCain.  Democrat loyalist Senator Carl Levin (Michigan) will replace him.

The impact of the Democratic Party’s 2000 candidate for Vice President, who received more tallied votes than Dick Cheney, changing parties would match the impact of Colin Powell’s abandonment of the Republican Party that made his career.

Plus, it would give Lieberman a one-day platform to make a powerful statement as to why he supports McCain and not Powell’s “transformational” favorite. Leaving behind a long-time political party affiliation would be a brave and decisive move.

So, Senator Lieberman, sir, it’s carpe diem time.  Abandon ship, before they make you walk the plank.