Fred Barnes and the 'Nightmare on Pennsylvania Avenue'

Rick Moran
Fred Barnes is no alarmist. He is one of the most insightful political analysts in America. I have been reading him for more than 20 years and he has always written penetrating, logical, and reasoned stuff.

His article in today's Weekly Standard puts in stark relief just what we're in for with an Obama presidency.

Some samples:

Then Democrats might go after a longstanding target of big labor, section 14(b) of the Taft-Hartley Act. It allows states to enact right-to-work laws, which bar workers from being forced to join a union. Twenty-two states have right-to-work laws.

The liberal scheme for killing conservative talk radio--the so-called fairness doctrine--would stand an excellent chance of becoming law. It would require radio stations to offer equal time, for free, to anyone seeking to reply to broadcasts featuring political opinion. To remain profitable, many stations would have to drop conservative talk shows, a major medium for communicating conservative ideas, rather than give up hours of free time. Obama has said he opposes the fairness doctrine. But would he veto it? Not likely.

Obama would nominate liberals to fill Supreme Court vacancies--no doubt about that--with the strong likelihood they'd be confirmed. As a senator, he voted against John Roberts and Sam Alito. And free trade agreements would become a thing of the past, given liberal and labor opposition.

What about Obama's health care plan? He's described it as step or two away from a single payer, government-run health system like Canada's. While expensive, its chances of passage would be quite good.

A bad economy, however, might keep Obama and his allies in Congress from passing his entire package of tax increases and his "cap and trade" proposal for curbing the emission of greenhouse gases. Obama has called for increasing the tax rate on capital gains, dividends, and the income of top earners, and raising the cap on payroll taxes. But tax hikes would worsen, not stimulate, a weak economy. So that might make Democrats balk--except they might not. For liberals, requiring the well-to-do to pay higher taxes is a matter of ideology.

This doesn't include what Obama would do in foreign and defense policy.

I think an Obama victory portends a longer, more severe recession, a weakening of American resolve abroad against terror, against Russia and China, and against dictators, and an "anything goes" court system" that will have us shaking our heads in wonder at some decisions, trying to figure out how a rational human being could arrive at such a stunningly stupid conclusion.

I think I'll wait until after the election to drink the hemlock...




Fred Barnes is no alarmist. He is one of the most insightful political analysts in America. I have been reading him for more than 20 years and he has always written penetrating, logical, and reasoned stuff.

His article in today's Weekly Standard puts in stark relief just what we're in for with an Obama presidency.

Some samples:

Then Democrats might go after a longstanding target of big labor, section 14(b) of the Taft-Hartley Act. It allows states to enact right-to-work laws, which bar workers from being forced to join a union. Twenty-two states have right-to-work laws.

The liberal scheme for killing conservative talk radio--the so-called fairness doctrine--would stand an excellent chance of becoming law. It would require radio stations to offer equal time, for free, to anyone seeking to reply to broadcasts featuring political opinion. To remain profitable, many stations would have to drop conservative talk shows, a major medium for communicating conservative ideas, rather than give up hours of free time. Obama has said he opposes the fairness doctrine. But would he veto it? Not likely.

Obama would nominate liberals to fill Supreme Court vacancies--no doubt about that--with the strong likelihood they'd be confirmed. As a senator, he voted against John Roberts and Sam Alito. And free trade agreements would become a thing of the past, given liberal and labor opposition.

What about Obama's health care plan? He's described it as step or two away from a single payer, government-run health system like Canada's. While expensive, its chances of passage would be quite good.

A bad economy, however, might keep Obama and his allies in Congress from passing his entire package of tax increases and his "cap and trade" proposal for curbing the emission of greenhouse gases. Obama has called for increasing the tax rate on capital gains, dividends, and the income of top earners, and raising the cap on payroll taxes. But tax hikes would worsen, not stimulate, a weak economy. So that might make Democrats balk--except they might not. For liberals, requiring the well-to-do to pay higher taxes is a matter of ideology.

This doesn't include what Obama would do in foreign and defense policy.

I think an Obama victory portends a longer, more severe recession, a weakening of American resolve abroad against terror, against Russia and China, and against dictators, and an "anything goes" court system" that will have us shaking our heads in wonder at some decisions, trying to figure out how a rational human being could arrive at such a stunningly stupid conclusion.

I think I'll wait until after the election to drink the hemlock...