Wright Rides Again

You just can't keep a bad reverend down.  Sermonizing about his favorite boy, Reverend Jeremiah Wright continued his inspirational preaching 

"This ordinary boy [Obama] just might be the first president in the history of the United States to have a black woman sleeping at 1600 Pennsylvania legally," Wright said, referring to Michelle Obama, in a sermon at the Wheeler Avenue Baptist Church in Houston.

Amen Reverend!  You tell them!

And he did.

"An ordinary black boy raised in a single-parent home . . . walked into my office 20 years ago to talk about his dream for a community that concentrated on things that we could achieve in common."
Twenty years ago Obama was in his mid twenties, a graduate of Harvard Law School.  He was not ordinary, he certainly was not a boy.  And he wasn't always raised in a single parent home. He was also raised in a two (grand) parent home when his white mother took off leaving the boy--for that's what he was then--in the care of his white grandparents. But Obama and Wright did use a dream for a community as a steppingstone to achieve great things for themselves; Obama  in politics, Wright in wealth and influence.  But for many in their human communities Obama's and Wright's dreams turned into their nightmare.

Will Barack Obama throw Reverend Jeremiah Wright under the bus again?
You just can't keep a bad reverend down.  Sermonizing about his favorite boy, Reverend Jeremiah Wright continued his inspirational preaching 

"This ordinary boy [Obama] just might be the first president in the history of the United States to have a black woman sleeping at 1600 Pennsylvania legally," Wright said, referring to Michelle Obama, in a sermon at the Wheeler Avenue Baptist Church in Houston.

Amen Reverend!  You tell them!

And he did.

"An ordinary black boy raised in a single-parent home . . . walked into my office 20 years ago to talk about his dream for a community that concentrated on things that we could achieve in common."
Twenty years ago Obama was in his mid twenties, a graduate of Harvard Law School.  He was not ordinary, he certainly was not a boy.  And he wasn't always raised in a single parent home. He was also raised in a two (grand) parent home when his white mother took off leaving the boy--for that's what he was then--in the care of his white grandparents. But Obama and Wright did use a dream for a community as a steppingstone to achieve great things for themselves; Obama  in politics, Wright in wealth and influence.  But for many in their human communities Obama's and Wright's dreams turned into their nightmare.

Will Barack Obama throw Reverend Jeremiah Wright under the bus again?