Obama's Multitasking Comment

The irony in Senator Barack Obama's comment about a president needing to be able to do two things at once passed without notice.  It was more than an indirect put-down of McCain. It revealed the focus of Obama's life -- himself.

When asked about his intentions to attend Friday's debate after McCain announced he was returning to Washington, Obama said:

"With respect to the debate it's my belief that this is exactly the time when the American people need to hear from the person who is, in approximately 40 days, will be responsible for dealing with this mess,'' Obama said. "I think it is going to be part of the president's job to be able to deal with more than one thing at once.''

This urgency to debate oddly comes from a candidate who successfully dodged his opponent's invitation for joint appearances all summer.  But nevermind that, that's not the irony. 

The position that Obama once held as State Senator in Illinois is a part-time job. (A close relative of mine was once the secretary for one.)  State Senators can hold other jobs to pay the mortgage. Obama was an attorney, a lecturer at a law school, and an autobiographer (someone who write about self).  

U.S. Senator is a full-time job. Since elected in 2004, Obama worked full-time at that job for slightly less than five months. Then he hit the campaign trail where he's been a full-time candidate working for himself ever since.  

So, what two things has Obama been doing at once? The people of the State of Illinois hired him to represent them in the Senate, I assume. But he's spent most of his time representing and promoting himself.  

Somebody help me here: Where's the multitasking in that?

Meanwhile, McCain put country before self, as has been his life's pattern, and, at a critical time, chose to go back to the job he's paid to do.  

If Obama is elected president he'll have no higher position for which to campaign.  Well, except maybe Secretary General of the United Nations after his Global Poverty Act of 2007 passes and the U.N. has a pile of taxpayer money to spread around the globe.
The irony in Senator Barack Obama's comment about a president needing to be able to do two things at once passed without notice.  It was more than an indirect put-down of McCain. It revealed the focus of Obama's life -- himself.

When asked about his intentions to attend Friday's debate after McCain announced he was returning to Washington, Obama said:

"With respect to the debate it's my belief that this is exactly the time when the American people need to hear from the person who is, in approximately 40 days, will be responsible for dealing with this mess,'' Obama said. "I think it is going to be part of the president's job to be able to deal with more than one thing at once.''

This urgency to debate oddly comes from a candidate who successfully dodged his opponent's invitation for joint appearances all summer.  But nevermind that, that's not the irony. 

The position that Obama once held as State Senator in Illinois is a part-time job. (A close relative of mine was once the secretary for one.)  State Senators can hold other jobs to pay the mortgage. Obama was an attorney, a lecturer at a law school, and an autobiographer (someone who write about self).  

U.S. Senator is a full-time job. Since elected in 2004, Obama worked full-time at that job for slightly less than five months. Then he hit the campaign trail where he's been a full-time candidate working for himself ever since.  

So, what two things has Obama been doing at once? The people of the State of Illinois hired him to represent them in the Senate, I assume. But he's spent most of his time representing and promoting himself.  

Somebody help me here: Where's the multitasking in that?

Meanwhile, McCain put country before self, as has been his life's pattern, and, at a critical time, chose to go back to the job he's paid to do.  

If Obama is elected president he'll have no higher position for which to campaign.  Well, except maybe Secretary General of the United Nations after his Global Poverty Act of 2007 passes and the U.N. has a pile of taxpayer money to spread around the globe.