NBC's Obama Campaign Commercial on 'Saturday Night Live'

I suppose we shouldn't be surprised that NBC would air a skit on their hit show Saturday Night Live that savages John McCain while be factually challenged. What is surprising is that former SNL writer and current candidate for the senate seat in Minnesota held by Norm Coleman Al Franken actually decided to lend his mates a hand in writing the "satire:"

Al Franken, the former "Saturday Night Live" star now running in a high-profile Senate race in Minnesota, helped craft the opening sketch mocking John McCain that kicked off the NBC comedy show Saturday, according to two well-placed sources inside the network.

Franken, who hasn’t been a staff writer on the show for 13 years, “phoned in” a spoof of McCain recording campaign ads in an edit booth, said an NBC source. Seth Meyers, the show’s current head writer, wrote it, but the sketch was hatched by Franken, a longtime liberal satirist and comedian.

An SNL insider said that, as of the Wednesday script read-through, Franken was the “credited writer with Meyers” on the opening sketch. Show veteran Darrell Hammond is to play McCain.

Franken’s input to the show blindsided his campaign staff, who have been forced to explain away some of the more crass and profane parts of his past writing and acting that have been used as fodder against him in a state known for its polite manners.


Manners are the least of this boorish lout's difficulties with Minnesota voters. Perhaps seeing how the philistine spends his time will make some of those hard headed Minnesotans ask some penetrating questions about Franken.

Politico makes the understatement of the year:


Franken's campaign sought to downplay the conversations, noting that the idea grew out of a discussion between old friends and that Franken had not been pitching an idea.

And a source close to the show said it was not uncommon for past "Saturday Night Live" stars to suggest ideas to current writers and cast members.

But word that the network's signature comedy show has allowed a liberal Democrat Senate candidate to shape content mocking the Republican presidential nominee may fuel sentiment that the network is sympathetic to the left
Gee. Ya think?

Hat tip: Rich Baehr

I suppose we shouldn't be surprised that NBC would air a skit on their hit show Saturday Night Live that savages John McCain while be factually challenged. What is surprising is that former SNL writer and current candidate for the senate seat in Minnesota held by Norm Coleman Al Franken actually decided to lend his mates a hand in writing the "satire:"

Al Franken, the former "Saturday Night Live" star now running in a high-profile Senate race in Minnesota, helped craft the opening sketch mocking John McCain that kicked off the NBC comedy show Saturday, according to two well-placed sources inside the network.

Franken, who hasn’t been a staff writer on the show for 13 years, “phoned in” a spoof of McCain recording campaign ads in an edit booth, said an NBC source. Seth Meyers, the show’s current head writer, wrote it, but the sketch was hatched by Franken, a longtime liberal satirist and comedian.

An SNL insider said that, as of the Wednesday script read-through, Franken was the “credited writer with Meyers” on the opening sketch. Show veteran Darrell Hammond is to play McCain.

Franken’s input to the show blindsided his campaign staff, who have been forced to explain away some of the more crass and profane parts of his past writing and acting that have been used as fodder against him in a state known for its polite manners.


Manners are the least of this boorish lout's difficulties with Minnesota voters. Perhaps seeing how the philistine spends his time will make some of those hard headed Minnesotans ask some penetrating questions about Franken.

Politico makes the understatement of the year:


Franken's campaign sought to downplay the conversations, noting that the idea grew out of a discussion between old friends and that Franken had not been pitching an idea.

And a source close to the show said it was not uncommon for past "Saturday Night Live" stars to suggest ideas to current writers and cast members.

But word that the network's signature comedy show has allowed a liberal Democrat Senate candidate to shape content mocking the Republican presidential nominee may fuel sentiment that the network is sympathetic to the left
Gee. Ya think?

Hat tip: Rich Baehr