Good news is no news

There has been very little news coverage about the aftermath of Hurricane Ike, especially when compared to the saturation coverage that followed Katrina.  Glenn Reynolds provided some links to photos from the area and received many thoughtful e-mails from area residents.  Here is an example.
First note that I am a former New Orleans resident. I left in 1991, in part because it was apparent that in the event of the eventual natural disaster, evacuation would not be possible on the short notice that hurricanes give; in part because of the glaring ineptness of the City of New Orleans to deal with routine crime, civic, and economic needs - much less a major problem; and in part because of the mindset of about half of the New Orleans populace, "I have a problem and you must help me."

I currently reside in the countryside an hour north of Houston. Many of the folks that I work with commute from Houston or points in between. Most of us have been dealing without power (and water if on a well, such as I). One coworker had a large oak tree come through her roof, another had three large oaks that totally demolished her home. Of the hundred or more persons I've spoken to since Ike came through, one, ONLY one, has said anything about FEMA or the government having any responsibility to help.

The difference is that simple, Ike is not newsworthy because there are no clamoring masses demanding assistance (and blaming Bush because it wasn't here yesterday). Folks hereabouts wear boots. Boots have bootstraps, and we know how to use them. Ike has been awful. We've simply chosen to deal with it. We are extremely grateful for any and all assistance, but recognize that it is our problem, not that of others.
There has been very little news coverage about the aftermath of Hurricane Ike, especially when compared to the saturation coverage that followed Katrina.  Glenn Reynolds provided some links to photos from the area and received many thoughtful e-mails from area residents.  Here is an example.
First note that I am a former New Orleans resident. I left in 1991, in part because it was apparent that in the event of the eventual natural disaster, evacuation would not be possible on the short notice that hurricanes give; in part because of the glaring ineptness of the City of New Orleans to deal with routine crime, civic, and economic needs - much less a major problem; and in part because of the mindset of about half of the New Orleans populace, "I have a problem and you must help me."

I currently reside in the countryside an hour north of Houston. Many of the folks that I work with commute from Houston or points in between. Most of us have been dealing without power (and water if on a well, such as I). One coworker had a large oak tree come through her roof, another had three large oaks that totally demolished her home. Of the hundred or more persons I've spoken to since Ike came through, one, ONLY one, has said anything about FEMA or the government having any responsibility to help.

The difference is that simple, Ike is not newsworthy because there are no clamoring masses demanding assistance (and blaming Bush because it wasn't here yesterday). Folks hereabouts wear boots. Boots have bootstraps, and we know how to use them. Ike has been awful. We've simply chosen to deal with it. We are extremely grateful for any and all assistance, but recognize that it is our problem, not that of others.