The obligatory 'Lieberman on McCain's Short List' Post

Rick Moran
So says the Financial Times. And it really isn't suprising when you think about it. Lieberman gives McCain something that other candidates don't; proof that he is a different candidate for president.
 
Mr Lieberman, who has campaigned for the Arizona senator, has long been ­considered an unconventional but plausible choice for Mr McCain.

Although Democrats have rejected Mr McCain's image as a maverick politician, Mr Lieberman's support for the presumptive Republican nominee has, much to the chagrin of his former ­colleagues, helped to boost Mr McCain's reputation as a bi-partisan legislator with friends on both sides of the aisle. Mr Lieberman, a staunch supporter of Israel, could also help Mr McCain win over Jewish voters.

"[McCain] loves Lieberman. And he is on the [short-]list because Lieberman has never embarrassed anyone, never misspoken. The first rule is, don't take someone who costs you votes," said one McCain adviser.



Taking Romney or anyone else being vetted would simply be standard politics. But reaching out and choosing a Jewish independent senator closely identified with the Democratic party would definitely be a huge plus for McCain among independents, conservative Democratics, and perhaps even a good percentage of Jewish voters who traditionally vote for the Democrat in overwhelming numbers. But what are Lieberman's true chances?

Conservative idealogues would hit the roof, no doubt - and for good reason. "Fightin' Joe" is a big supporter of big labor, big government, and big budgets. He's against tax cuts and is suspect on drilling. In short, Lieberman is a pretty good canddate for Vice President, alright - but for Obama not McCain.

Nevertheless, McCain, the Maverick, might just feel he has to make a big splash with his pick of running mate and there is little doubt that Lieberman would fill that bill. Whether he wants to alienate a good chunk of his base in the process is a question the candidate will have to address before that historic choice is made.
So says the Financial Times. And it really isn't suprising when you think about it. Lieberman gives McCain something that other candidates don't; proof that he is a different candidate for president.
 
Mr Lieberman, who has campaigned for the Arizona senator, has long been ­considered an unconventional but plausible choice for Mr McCain.

Although Democrats have rejected Mr McCain's image as a maverick politician, Mr Lieberman's support for the presumptive Republican nominee has, much to the chagrin of his former ­colleagues, helped to boost Mr McCain's reputation as a bi-partisan legislator with friends on both sides of the aisle. Mr Lieberman, a staunch supporter of Israel, could also help Mr McCain win over Jewish voters.

"[McCain] loves Lieberman. And he is on the [short-]list because Lieberman has never embarrassed anyone, never misspoken. The first rule is, don't take someone who costs you votes," said one McCain adviser.



Taking Romney or anyone else being vetted would simply be standard politics. But reaching out and choosing a Jewish independent senator closely identified with the Democratic party would definitely be a huge plus for McCain among independents, conservative Democratics, and perhaps even a good percentage of Jewish voters who traditionally vote for the Democrat in overwhelming numbers. But what are Lieberman's true chances?

Conservative idealogues would hit the roof, no doubt - and for good reason. "Fightin' Joe" is a big supporter of big labor, big government, and big budgets. He's against tax cuts and is suspect on drilling. In short, Lieberman is a pretty good canddate for Vice President, alright - but for Obama not McCain.

Nevertheless, McCain, the Maverick, might just feel he has to make a big splash with his pick of running mate and there is little doubt that Lieberman would fill that bill. Whether he wants to alienate a good chunk of his base in the process is a question the candidate will have to address before that historic choice is made.