Obama bleeding support among Democratic conservatives

There aren't many of them but less than 2 out three conservative Democrats - 63% - are now supporting Barack Obama for president according to Gallup, down from 68% last month and a high of 72% in mid-July:

As a result of this, support for Obama among all Democratic registered voters fell from 81% in early August (Aug. 4-10) to 78% last week (Aug. 18-24). Obama's support from Republicans over this period also dipped from 9% to 7%, while 42% to 43% of independents have consistently supported him.

The 78% of Democrats backing Obama from Aug. 18-24 ties for the lowest seen since early June. The 7% of Republicans for Obama is the lowest to date (since the start of Gallup Poll Daily tracking of the Obama-McCain race in March).

Expect those numbers to rise significantly the closer we get to November. But will Obama get the 88% of Democrats that John Kerry received in 2004? He's got a long way to go and I don't think he will make it. This may cause problems in Pennsylvania, Ohio, and a couple of other midwestern toss up states where these conservative Democrats are concentrated.

Obama has shown little interest in addressing the issues of these conservatives and it may cost him dearly on election day.
There aren't many of them but less than 2 out three conservative Democrats - 63% - are now supporting Barack Obama for president according to Gallup, down from 68% last month and a high of 72% in mid-July:

As a result of this, support for Obama among all Democratic registered voters fell from 81% in early August (Aug. 4-10) to 78% last week (Aug. 18-24). Obama's support from Republicans over this period also dipped from 9% to 7%, while 42% to 43% of independents have consistently supported him.

The 78% of Democrats backing Obama from Aug. 18-24 ties for the lowest seen since early June. The 7% of Republicans for Obama is the lowest to date (since the start of Gallup Poll Daily tracking of the Obama-McCain race in March).

Expect those numbers to rise significantly the closer we get to November. But will Obama get the 88% of Democrats that John Kerry received in 2004? He's got a long way to go and I don't think he will make it. This may cause problems in Pennsylvania, Ohio, and a couple of other midwestern toss up states where these conservative Democrats are concentrated.

Obama has shown little interest in addressing the issues of these conservatives and it may cost him dearly on election day.