Musharraf expected to resign

Pakistani President Pervez Musharraf is expected to resign "in the next few days" according to the Washington Post:

Faced with mounting pressure from former political allies and dwindling support from his international backers, Pakistani President Pervez Musharraf, once a top U.S. ally, is expected to resign in the next few days, according to Pakistani officials.



A week after leaders of the ruling coalition said they planned to impeach Musharraf, the capital was abuzz with speculation that he would step down before formal impeachment charges are filed in Parliament on Monday. Musharraf, who seized power in a military coup nine years ago, has survived at least two assassination attempts. But his opponents said Thursday that he was unlikely to withstand the current challenge to his presidency.



Musharraf has said he has no plans to leave Pakistan, although some analysts and political associates have suggested he could take up residence in Turkey, where he spent several years of his childhood. One senior Pakistani official said Musharraf's opening position in preliminary talks about his future was a demand for "indemnity and immunity" from prosecution.


Some American analysts fear a further destablization of Pakistan as a result of Mushrarraf's departure. This may be the price to pay for future stability down the road. Musharraf lurking in the background with the ever present threat of a military coup arising every time the Pakistani government acted in a way contrary to his desires will disappear with his departure. That is not to say that the government will act any more intelligently to confront the growing crisis of extremism in their midst. But at least they will have a free hand to do so.

What remains for Musharraf is negotiating his exit. He wants immunity from prosecution for his overstepping the constitution during emergency rule. This he may get if he agrees to leave the country. The government wants no chance of him being able to plot a comeback using his ties to the army.

The president of the Pakistani senate will take over temporary duties as president for 30 days. Parliament will then vote on Musharraf's successor.
Pakistani President Pervez Musharraf is expected to resign "in the next few days" according to the Washington Post:

Faced with mounting pressure from former political allies and dwindling support from his international backers, Pakistani President Pervez Musharraf, once a top U.S. ally, is expected to resign in the next few days, according to Pakistani officials.



A week after leaders of the ruling coalition said they planned to impeach Musharraf, the capital was abuzz with speculation that he would step down before formal impeachment charges are filed in Parliament on Monday. Musharraf, who seized power in a military coup nine years ago, has survived at least two assassination attempts. But his opponents said Thursday that he was unlikely to withstand the current challenge to his presidency.



Musharraf has said he has no plans to leave Pakistan, although some analysts and political associates have suggested he could take up residence in Turkey, where he spent several years of his childhood. One senior Pakistani official said Musharraf's opening position in preliminary talks about his future was a demand for "indemnity and immunity" from prosecution.


Some American analysts fear a further destablization of Pakistan as a result of Mushrarraf's departure. This may be the price to pay for future stability down the road. Musharraf lurking in the background with the ever present threat of a military coup arising every time the Pakistani government acted in a way contrary to his desires will disappear with his departure. That is not to say that the government will act any more intelligently to confront the growing crisis of extremism in their midst. But at least they will have a free hand to do so.

What remains for Musharraf is negotiating his exit. He wants immunity from prosecution for his overstepping the constitution during emergency rule. This he may get if he agrees to leave the country. The government wants no chance of him being able to plot a comeback using his ties to the army.

The president of the Pakistani senate will take over temporary duties as president for 30 days. Parliament will then vote on Musharraf's successor.