Chicoms ease some internet restrictions for Olympics

Rick Moran
The IOC is making out like everything is fine now, that because the Chinese communists have eased some of their draconian restrictions on accessing internet sites not approved by the censors that we can get on and enjoy ourselves watching the sporting events.

Not so fast, my sniveling western puppies. The "concessions" you got from the commies were grand but horribly inadequate. But then what did we expect from a bunch of groveling, elitist socialist weinees on the IOC?

But although access was restored to some long-blocked websites maintained by human rights groups and news organizations, others - those advocating independence for Tibet or dealing with the banned spiritual movement Falungong - remained off limits. It was also not clear how far the relaxation of internet control extended within China, and skeptics doubted it would persist beyond the period of the Games. "Everyone knows that the minute the circus is over, the walls will be put straight up again," says Russell Leigh Moses, a China scholar based in Beijing.


The decision was presented by the IOC as a direct response of its pressure "The issue were put on the table and the IOC requested that the Olympic Games hosts addressed them," a press release stated. "We trust them to keep their promise."


The IOC has faced considerable criticism for failing to press the Chinese authorities to keep their promises that awarding Beijing the Games would make China a more open society and improve its human rights record. Amnesty International reported on July 22 that instead of improving human rights, the hosting of the Games had actually had the opposite effect. "In fact, the crackdown on human rights defenders, journalists and lawyers has intensified because Beijing is hosting the Olympics," the report stated. "The authorities have stepped up repression of dissident voices in their efforts to present an image of 'stability'and 'harmony' to the outside world."

How much you want to bet that's one story that doesn't make it past the press line in Beijing?

And what of our brave reporters? I know it's not their fault but where's that famous independence? Surely a protest of some sort was in order? If the commies don't want to be criticized for their lax human rights record, why appear to assist them by meekly going along with their rank censorship of your personal computer? 

Too much to expect, I suppose. Let's hope they don't put up with the Chicoms censoring their dispatches.
The IOC is making out like everything is fine now, that because the Chinese communists have eased some of their draconian restrictions on accessing internet sites not approved by the censors that we can get on and enjoy ourselves watching the sporting events.

Not so fast, my sniveling western puppies. The "concessions" you got from the commies were grand but horribly inadequate. But then what did we expect from a bunch of groveling, elitist socialist weinees on the IOC?

But although access was restored to some long-blocked websites maintained by human rights groups and news organizations, others - those advocating independence for Tibet or dealing with the banned spiritual movement Falungong - remained off limits. It was also not clear how far the relaxation of internet control extended within China, and skeptics doubted it would persist beyond the period of the Games. "Everyone knows that the minute the circus is over, the walls will be put straight up again," says Russell Leigh Moses, a China scholar based in Beijing.


The decision was presented by the IOC as a direct response of its pressure "The issue were put on the table and the IOC requested that the Olympic Games hosts addressed them," a press release stated. "We trust them to keep their promise."


The IOC has faced considerable criticism for failing to press the Chinese authorities to keep their promises that awarding Beijing the Games would make China a more open society and improve its human rights record. Amnesty International reported on July 22 that instead of improving human rights, the hosting of the Games had actually had the opposite effect. "In fact, the crackdown on human rights defenders, journalists and lawyers has intensified because Beijing is hosting the Olympics," the report stated. "The authorities have stepped up repression of dissident voices in their efforts to present an image of 'stability'and 'harmony' to the outside world."

How much you want to bet that's one story that doesn't make it past the press line in Beijing?

And what of our brave reporters? I know it's not their fault but where's that famous independence? Surely a protest of some sort was in order? If the commies don't want to be criticized for their lax human rights record, why appear to assist them by meekly going along with their rank censorship of your personal computer? 

Too much to expect, I suppose. Let's hope they don't put up with the Chicoms censoring their dispatches.