BBC fined for 'repeated instances of premeditated, deliberate deception'

Thomas Lifson
The UK's official media regulator Ofcom has levied a record fine (£400,000/$790,000)  against the British Broadcasting Corporation for deliberate deception. The News Division of the BBC was not involved in this particular scandal, though the Corporation has in the past admitted to bias there, too, and even spent $2 million recently to teach its news division employees about the truth.

The UK Independent writes:

The regulator said: "These breaches of the [broadcasting] code were very serious. In each of these cases, the BBC deceived its audience by faking winners of competitions and deliberately conducting competitions unfairly."

The BBC responds:

"We accept Ofcom's findings. We have taken these issues extremely seriously from the outset, apologising to our audiences and putting in place an unprecedented action plan to tackle the issues raised."

If the plans are unprecedented, Doesn't mean that the other scandals in the news division weren't handled as thoroughly?

Hat tip: David Paulin

The UK's official media regulator Ofcom has levied a record fine (£400,000/$790,000)  against the British Broadcasting Corporation for deliberate deception. The News Division of the BBC was not involved in this particular scandal, though the Corporation has in the past admitted to bias there, too, and even spent $2 million recently to teach its news division employees about the truth.

The UK Independent writes:

The regulator said: "These breaches of the [broadcasting] code were very serious. In each of these cases, the BBC deceived its audience by faking winners of competitions and deliberately conducting competitions unfairly."

The BBC responds:

"We accept Ofcom's findings. We have taken these issues extremely seriously from the outset, apologising to our audiences and putting in place an unprecedented action plan to tackle the issues raised."

If the plans are unprecedented, Doesn't mean that the other scandals in the news division weren't handled as thoroughly?

Hat tip: David Paulin