An Interesting Juxtaposition

In its lead editorial today, the New York Times once again demonstrates its usual sacrifice of fact and ignorance of history to find a tortuous path for assigning blame to George Bush's administration for the recent Russian invasion of Georgia -- all caused, it is claimed by the horrendous error of befriending a state which reached out in support of the United States and Western Europe.

But, wait. Right across the page in the op-ed section, is an explanation of the actual causes of the current conflict, written by a real expert on the region, whose credentials as  research director of the Central Asia-Caucasus Institute at Johns Hopkins University’s School of Advanced International Studies, indicate a lot more knowledge of the subject than the propagandists who pen editorials for the Times.

He merely provides a sensible and educated insight into the underlying causes of the conflict which, to put it politely, make the Times's editorial writers appear liars or ignoramuses, or both.
In its lead editorial today, the New York Times once again demonstrates its usual sacrifice of fact and ignorance of history to find a tortuous path for assigning blame to George Bush's administration for the recent Russian invasion of Georgia -- all caused, it is claimed by the horrendous error of befriending a state which reached out in support of the United States and Western Europe.

But, wait. Right across the page in the op-ed section, is an explanation of the actual causes of the current conflict, written by a real expert on the region, whose credentials as  research director of the Central Asia-Caucasus Institute at Johns Hopkins University’s School of Advanced International Studies, indicate a lot more knowledge of the subject than the propagandists who pen editorials for the Times.

He merely provides a sensible and educated insight into the underlying causes of the conflict which, to put it politely, make the Times's editorial writers appear liars or ignoramuses, or both.