Tony Snow Dead at 53

Rick Moran
Former White House Press Secretary for President Bush Tony Snow died early this morning, a victim of a reoccuring cancer that may have dimmed his health but never his spirit.

Snow was one of the few conservatives in Washington who actually enjoyed cordial relations with the press and other liberals. He was combative without being personal, a warrior for the right but a man who prided himself on bridging understanding to both sides. His stint as press secretary was marked by tense but respectful relations with the White House press corps who, by the time of Tony's ascension to the position in 2005, had come to look upon the White House spokesperson as the enemy. Snow's gift was to earn their respect without pandering to them.

A well known personality long before he made it to the White House, Snow hosted Fox News Sunday and was a frequent analyst on the network's political shows. Previously, he worked as a speechwriter for Bush #41 after a stint as an editor at several newspapers including the Washington Times.

Snow's battle with cancer was played out in public but his courage and honesty won him many admirers. His first bout with colon cancer earned him a standing ovation when he returned to his job as press secretary. And in announcing the reoccurence of his disease, he typically looked on the bright side
saying, "I want to thank you all. It really meant the world to me. Anybody who does not not believe that thoughts and prayers make a difference, they're just wrong." He added "I'm a very lucky guy."

After his second bout with cancer went into remission, Tony resigned as press secretary and took an analyst job at Fox rival CNN. But in March, a growth was discovered in his stomach and he never fully recovered from the surgery.

Snow leaves behind a wife and three children. Too young to leave us and a man who enriched the lives of those who knew him.
Former White House Press Secretary for President Bush Tony Snow died early this morning, a victim of a reoccuring cancer that may have dimmed his health but never his spirit.

Snow was one of the few conservatives in Washington who actually enjoyed cordial relations with the press and other liberals. He was combative without being personal, a warrior for the right but a man who prided himself on bridging understanding to both sides. His stint as press secretary was marked by tense but respectful relations with the White House press corps who, by the time of Tony's ascension to the position in 2005, had come to look upon the White House spokesperson as the enemy. Snow's gift was to earn their respect without pandering to them.

A well known personality long before he made it to the White House, Snow hosted Fox News Sunday and was a frequent analyst on the network's political shows. Previously, he worked as a speechwriter for Bush #41 after a stint as an editor at several newspapers including the Washington Times.

Snow's battle with cancer was played out in public but his courage and honesty won him many admirers. His first bout with colon cancer earned him a standing ovation when he returned to his job as press secretary. And in announcing the reoccurence of his disease, he typically looked on the bright side
saying, "I want to thank you all. It really meant the world to me. Anybody who does not not believe that thoughts and prayers make a difference, they're just wrong." He added "I'm a very lucky guy."

After his second bout with cancer went into remission, Tony resigned as press secretary and took an analyst job at Fox rival CNN. But in March, a growth was discovered in his stomach and he never fully recovered from the surgery.

Snow leaves behind a wife and three children. Too young to leave us and a man who enriched the lives of those who knew him.