Rep. Rangel's Special Housing Arrangements

Rick Moran
Representative Charles Rangel has represented the 15th Congressional district in New York city since 1971 when he defeated the legendary Adam Clayton Powell in the Democratic primary. The district encompasses Harlem, Washington Heights, and the Upper West side - a mix of rich and poor crammed together in the smallest Congressional district area wise in the country
 
Perhaps the most colorful Congressman of the modern era, Powell was brought down by misusing committee funds for his own purposes and other blatant corruptions in Congress where by the late 1960's, he had found a boring place and began spending more and more time at his "retreat" in Bimini. Rangel ran on the promise that he would always be there for his constituents, representing their interests in Congress.

This may be so as Rangel is regularly judged one of the most effective Congressmen in the country. But when it comes to his place of residence, Rangel receives breaks few Congressmen - or people of his own district - are ever likely to get.

Rangel owns 4 apartments in Harlem - all rent controlled and located at one of the most valuable addresses in the area. He uses three of these units for his personal residence despite the fact that you are only supposed to possess one rent controlled property and only if you use it as your primary residence. Rangel's three adjoining apartments (he uses the fourth apartment located six floors below as a campaign office - again in violation of the law) would cost him $7,465 to $8,125 a month. Instead, thanks to rent control, Rangel pays $3894 for all 4 units. This, at what
is described as "Harlem's most prestigious address."

Nice break if you can get it.

Rangel's response? He has none except to say that it's no one's business and that it doesn't affect his representation of his constituents.

Shades of Adam Clayton Powell, indeed...


Hat Tip: Ed Lasky
Representative Charles Rangel has represented the 15th Congressional district in New York city since 1971 when he defeated the legendary Adam Clayton Powell in the Democratic primary. The district encompasses Harlem, Washington Heights, and the Upper West side - a mix of rich and poor crammed together in the smallest Congressional district area wise in the country
 
Perhaps the most colorful Congressman of the modern era, Powell was brought down by misusing committee funds for his own purposes and other blatant corruptions in Congress where by the late 1960's, he had found a boring place and began spending more and more time at his "retreat" in Bimini. Rangel ran on the promise that he would always be there for his constituents, representing their interests in Congress.

This may be so as Rangel is regularly judged one of the most effective Congressmen in the country. But when it comes to his place of residence, Rangel receives breaks few Congressmen - or people of his own district - are ever likely to get.

Rangel owns 4 apartments in Harlem - all rent controlled and located at one of the most valuable addresses in the area. He uses three of these units for his personal residence despite the fact that you are only supposed to possess one rent controlled property and only if you use it as your primary residence. Rangel's three adjoining apartments (he uses the fourth apartment located six floors below as a campaign office - again in violation of the law) would cost him $7,465 to $8,125 a month. Instead, thanks to rent control, Rangel pays $3894 for all 4 units. This, at what
is described as "Harlem's most prestigious address."

Nice break if you can get it.

Rangel's response? He has none except to say that it's no one's business and that it doesn't affect his representation of his constituents.

Shades of Adam Clayton Powell, indeed...


Hat Tip: Ed Lasky