Minority journalists give Obama a standing O

David Paulin
Despite their worries about unseemly displays of affection for a politician whose campaign they must cover, the minority journalists assembled at the "Unity" convention in Chicago managed to confine themselves to a discreet leap to their feet and a long standing ovation complete with whistles and cheers, when the candidate began his address. Guarding their journalistic objectivity, the crowd repeatedly ijnterrupted his address with applause.

Apparently no unseemly throwing of underwear, no fainting, and no carrying the candidate off the stage on the shoulders of the crowd, so it was downright demure at "Unity". Improving considerably on Unity's earlier sessions, no brawls, and no police called.

A news release regarding the convention's discussions is quite interesting. Among the highlights:

"National Public Radio presents the panel discussion "Covering Climate Change: Why Non-White Communities Could Be Hit the Hardest."

And then there was this (bold-faced added by me):

  • The National Association of Hispanic Journalists presents "Beyond 'Illegal Alien': Toward Fair, Ethical and Accurate Immigration Coverage." In the past year, the level of rhetoric surrounding immigration coverage has reached historic - often hysterical - levels in many communities. Readers in Texas and California, for example, are pressuring newspapers to publish the legal status of Latinos at the center of any story, whether or not it's related to immigration. But for reporters, where is the fine line between reporting the truth and fueling the flames, especially for journalists of color who face the dual challenge of pressure from Latinos in the community and editors in the newsroom? Join a panel of veteran immigration reporters for tactics to navigate these tricky waters. 1:15 p.m. to 2:45 p.m., McCormick Place West, W192C

The reference to "pressure from Latinos" in the community is interesting, because many long-time Texans of Mexican heritage are, in fact, not pleased with the wave of illegal immigrants coming here, according to a newspaper article I came across a whileback. Moreover, they'reespecially irritated whenthe illegal immigrants they encounter have the attitude that an "ethnic bond" ought to exist between them.


Despite their worries about unseemly displays of affection for a politician whose campaign they must cover, the minority journalists assembled at the "Unity" convention in Chicago managed to confine themselves to a discreet leap to their feet and a long standing ovation complete with whistles and cheers, when the candidate began his address. Guarding their journalistic objectivity, the crowd repeatedly ijnterrupted his address with applause.

Apparently no unseemly throwing of underwear, no fainting, and no carrying the candidate off the stage on the shoulders of the crowd, so it was downright demure at "Unity". Improving considerably on Unity's earlier sessions, no brawls, and no police called.

A news release regarding the convention's discussions is quite interesting. Among the highlights:

"National Public Radio presents the panel discussion "Covering Climate Change: Why Non-White Communities Could Be Hit the Hardest."

And then there was this (bold-faced added by me):

  • The National Association of Hispanic Journalists presents "Beyond 'Illegal Alien': Toward Fair, Ethical and Accurate Immigration Coverage." In the past year, the level of rhetoric surrounding immigration coverage has reached historic - often hysterical - levels in many communities. Readers in Texas and California, for example, are pressuring newspapers to publish the legal status of Latinos at the center of any story, whether or not it's related to immigration. But for reporters, where is the fine line between reporting the truth and fueling the flames, especially for journalists of color who face the dual challenge of pressure from Latinos in the community and editors in the newsroom? Join a panel of veteran immigration reporters for tactics to navigate these tricky waters. 1:15 p.m. to 2:45 p.m., McCormick Place West, W192C

The reference to "pressure from Latinos" in the community is interesting, because many long-time Texans of Mexican heritage are, in fact, not pleased with the wave of illegal immigrants coming here, according to a newspaper article I came across a whileback. Moreover, they'reespecially irritated whenthe illegal immigrants they encounter have the attitude that an "ethnic bond" ought to exist between them.