McCain and his 'Gramm Problem'

I suppose the former senator and former chairman of mortgage giant USB might have a hard time understanding the average American's fears and anxieties about the economy. After all, Phill Gramm's idea of rough economic times is probably being forced to cut down on the number of manicures he gets a week from 3 to 2.

How else can you explain his statement that he thought the American people were suffering from some kind of mental disease when it comes to the economy? Gramm thinks that the current economic downturn is a "mental recession" and that the American people are a "nation of whiners."

Not a great way to win friends and influence people, Phil.

Obama, for his part, came back with a
good one: "You know, America already has one Dr. Phil,” Obama said. He added: "When it comes to the economy, we don’t need another.”

McCain was livid, allowing his tart sense of humor to show through. When some reporter asked if Gramm was still in consideration for Secretary of the Treasury, Mcain said "I think Senator Gramm would be in serious consideration for ambassador to Belarus,” he said, “although I’m not sure the citizens of Minsk would welcome that.”

That sound you heard is McCain kicking Gramm through the windsheild of the bus and running him over - definite road kill.

Politicians don’t deal in “what ifs.” They leave that kind of thing to fans of the Chicago Cubs. Those who aspire to be president deal with the reality of the here and now. And John McCain, fighting perceptions of his own lack of understanding and compassion towards working folk, cannot tolerate nor can he afford his number one economic surrogate and advisor to run off at the mouth about the American people suffering from some demented notion that times are tough and that they should ignore everything that’s going on around them and be happy.


Things may be fine in some areas of the US but in the absolutely vital states of Michigan, Ohio, and Pennsylvania, there is real, demonstrable economic pain. What’s more, there is a palpable sense of fear in the air in those states. People don’t necessarily want government to guarantee them a job. They want to be reassured that their leaders understand what they are going through and that, true to our traditions and history as Americans – that things will be better in the future.


McCain can offer that - as long as he is not encumbered with twits like Phil Gramm.




 
I suppose the former senator and former chairman of mortgage giant USB might have a hard time understanding the average American's fears and anxieties about the economy. After all, Phill Gramm's idea of rough economic times is probably being forced to cut down on the number of manicures he gets a week from 3 to 2.

How else can you explain his statement that he thought the American people were suffering from some kind of mental disease when it comes to the economy? Gramm thinks that the current economic downturn is a "mental recession" and that the American people are a "nation of whiners."

Not a great way to win friends and influence people, Phil.

Obama, for his part, came back with a
good one: "You know, America already has one Dr. Phil,” Obama said. He added: "When it comes to the economy, we don’t need another.”

McCain was livid, allowing his tart sense of humor to show through. When some reporter asked if Gramm was still in consideration for Secretary of the Treasury, Mcain said "I think Senator Gramm would be in serious consideration for ambassador to Belarus,” he said, “although I’m not sure the citizens of Minsk would welcome that.”

That sound you heard is McCain kicking Gramm through the windsheild of the bus and running him over - definite road kill.

Politicians don’t deal in “what ifs.” They leave that kind of thing to fans of the Chicago Cubs. Those who aspire to be president deal with the reality of the here and now. And John McCain, fighting perceptions of his own lack of understanding and compassion towards working folk, cannot tolerate nor can he afford his number one economic surrogate and advisor to run off at the mouth about the American people suffering from some demented notion that times are tough and that they should ignore everything that’s going on around them and be happy.


Things may be fine in some areas of the US but in the absolutely vital states of Michigan, Ohio, and Pennsylvania, there is real, demonstrable economic pain. What’s more, there is a palpable sense of fear in the air in those states. People don’t necessarily want government to guarantee them a job. They want to be reassured that their leaders understand what they are going through and that, true to our traditions and history as Americans – that things will be better in the future.


McCain can offer that - as long as he is not encumbered with twits like Phil Gramm.