Iran's 'preconditions' to meet with a President Obama

Ed Lasky
Selig Harrison writes a column that ran in the current Newsweek (the Obama campaign's house organ) that channels the views of the Iranian regime about the preconditions they would demand of President Obama should he wish to negotiate with Iran. These include:
 America should end its hostile actions towards Iran;
 Set a firm timetable for withdraw of all US combat forces in IRAQ;
 Should halt all ongoing CIA efforts to overthrow the Islamic Republic
 Release Iranian assets frozen in US banks since the 1979 hostage crisis;
 End banking sanctions and resume sales of civilian aircraft
Harrison adds a few suggestions of his own:
Obama will be in a strong bargaining position if he sticks to his pledge to withdraw U.S. combat troops from Iraq over 16 months and also removes U.S. bombers from air bases there. In return, he could demand that Iran prevent the Iraqi Shiite militias it supports from harassing U.S. forces during the pullout, and help in rooting out Al Qaeda from Iraq—a goal Tehran shares with Washington.


To start a broader dialogue on the nuclear issue, Obama would have to take one crucial step sought by Iran: end CIA and Special Forces support for insurgents seeking to overthrow the Islamic republic, especially Kurdish separatists and the Iraq-based Mujahedin-e Khalq. This move wouldn't need to be publicly announced, however, and would thus have a low domestic political cost for Obama.


And Harrison suggests that "President Obama stand up to entrenched forces in the Pentagon, the CIA and allied intelligence services that are already engaged in covert actions against Iran" (presumably Israel).


But the kicker is the latest: Obama must demonstrate that he is not a Zionist agent before Iran agrees to negotiate with him


Clearly the Iranian regime is not reading American Thinker.

Selig Harrison writes a column that ran in the current Newsweek (the Obama campaign's house organ) that channels the views of the Iranian regime about the preconditions they would demand of President Obama should he wish to negotiate with Iran. These include:
 America should end its hostile actions towards Iran;
 Set a firm timetable for withdraw of all US combat forces in IRAQ;
 Should halt all ongoing CIA efforts to overthrow the Islamic Republic
 Release Iranian assets frozen in US banks since the 1979 hostage crisis;
 End banking sanctions and resume sales of civilian aircraft
Harrison adds a few suggestions of his own:
Obama will be in a strong bargaining position if he sticks to his pledge to withdraw U.S. combat troops from Iraq over 16 months and also removes U.S. bombers from air bases there. In return, he could demand that Iran prevent the Iraqi Shiite militias it supports from harassing U.S. forces during the pullout, and help in rooting out Al Qaeda from Iraq—a goal Tehran shares with Washington.


To start a broader dialogue on the nuclear issue, Obama would have to take one crucial step sought by Iran: end CIA and Special Forces support for insurgents seeking to overthrow the Islamic republic, especially Kurdish separatists and the Iraq-based Mujahedin-e Khalq. This move wouldn't need to be publicly announced, however, and would thus have a low domestic political cost for Obama.


And Harrison suggests that "President Obama stand up to entrenched forces in the Pentagon, the CIA and allied intelligence services that are already engaged in covert actions against Iran" (presumably Israel).


But the kicker is the latest: Obama must demonstrate that he is not a Zionist agent before Iran agrees to negotiate with him


Clearly the Iranian regime is not reading American Thinker.