Tim Russert, R.I.P.

Rick Moran
The passing of Tim Russert was a shock to the political system in America. For better or worse, journalists are now as much a part of governing in this country as any elected representative and when someone of Russert's stature dies as suddenly as he did yesterday, everyone in politics takes a deep breath and pauses to contemplate the event.

The fact that Russert was extremely well liked by almost all the media and politicians in Washington says something about the man's character. But it is his colleagues that we look to for the most emotional reactions.

Tom Brokaw, who insisted on making the announcement yesterday on live TV, was a very close friend and was in obvious distress. He pointed out that the two friends had very similiar upbringings; both grew up in middle class households headed by strong fathers. Both had a passion for politics that dominated their lives.

Brokaw said:

He was "one of the premier political journalists and analysts of his time," Tom Brokaw, the former longtime anchor of "NBC Nightly News," said in announcing Russert's death Friday afternoon. Brian Williams, managing editor and anchor of "NBC Nightly News," called his death a "staggering, overpowering and sudden loss."


Russert was something of a Rennaisance man when it came to broadcast news. In addition to hosting Meet the Press, he was also Washington Bureau chief for NBC news as well as a Vice President of News - an executive, administrator, and on-air talen all in one.

The cable nets were filled with news of his death with a surprising number of personalities and journalists who had worked with him at one time or another in their careers. Clearly, he was a man respected by his peers.

No word yet on who will take over hosting duties for Meet the Press.


The passing of Tim Russert was a shock to the political system in America. For better or worse, journalists are now as much a part of governing in this country as any elected representative and when someone of Russert's stature dies as suddenly as he did yesterday, everyone in politics takes a deep breath and pauses to contemplate the event.

The fact that Russert was extremely well liked by almost all the media and politicians in Washington says something about the man's character. But it is his colleagues that we look to for the most emotional reactions.

Tom Brokaw, who insisted on making the announcement yesterday on live TV, was a very close friend and was in obvious distress. He pointed out that the two friends had very similiar upbringings; both grew up in middle class households headed by strong fathers. Both had a passion for politics that dominated their lives.

Brokaw said:

He was "one of the premier political journalists and analysts of his time," Tom Brokaw, the former longtime anchor of "NBC Nightly News," said in announcing Russert's death Friday afternoon. Brian Williams, managing editor and anchor of "NBC Nightly News," called his death a "staggering, overpowering and sudden loss."


Russert was something of a Rennaisance man when it came to broadcast news. In addition to hosting Meet the Press, he was also Washington Bureau chief for NBC news as well as a Vice President of News - an executive, administrator, and on-air talen all in one.

The cable nets were filled with news of his death with a surprising number of personalities and journalists who had worked with him at one time or another in their careers. Clearly, he was a man respected by his peers.

No word yet on who will take over hosting duties for Meet the Press.