Condensed Version of McCain's Ottawa Speech

On June 20, John McCain delivered a 2,000-words speech to the Economic Club of Canada. In case you missed it, he's a paraphrased condensed version in outline form, with the word count allotted to each topic indicated.   Brief comments will follow.

Introduction (85 words)

Thanks for inviting me.  

Context: Canada & U.S. Relations (246)

The U.S. is lucky to have Canada as our neighbors, friends and allies.

General Trade Relations Between U.S. & Canada (171)

Our economies are interdependent, and that's been good for both of us.

Main Topics (70) [outlines main body of speech]

We share (A) security (B) environmental (C) energy, and (D) trade [not mentioned in the intro] interests and concerns.
A. Security

1. Bilateral Security (229)

We'll continue efforts to secure our shared border and cooperate on planning together for emergencies.

2. Global Security (428)

Americans appreciated Canadian sympathy after 9/11. We realize Canada has suffered casualties in Afghanistan, and has rendered considerable financial aid in both Iraq and Afghanistan. I share the objection of many Canadians to GITMO and will close it. Going forward, I'll seek and welcome your advice on such issues.

B. Global Warming (238)

The planet faces "grave environmental dangers that global warming can bring."  As president, I will pursue a "sensible cap-and-trade emissions system" in common cause with Canada.

C. Energy (61)

The U.S. and Canada "stand much to gain by harmonizing our energy policies."

D. NAFTA (248)

As president, I will honor our NAFTA agreements, and work to strengthen and improve NAFTA. 
Close (210)

Our relationship has not always been smooth, but it's always been productive, based on good will and mutual admiration. And so it will continue. [End]


Nothing in this speech seems to represent anything new coming from McCain.  He wanted the Canadians to know that he accepts the premise of man-made global warming, doesn't share the Democrats bashing of NAFTA, and will be more solicitous of their opinions than has been the current administration (the meta-message in that instance).


One question: Just what is the U.S. energy policy that McCain proposes to "harmonize" with Canada? And how?


Since the audience wasn't made up of U.S. voters, McCain did not, and had no need to, differentiate himself from Barack Obama.  Or should he have?


Suggestion: Read the entire speech and ask yourself: How much of this speech could not have been delivered by Obama?


On June 20, John McCain delivered a 2,000-words speech to the Economic Club of Canada. In case you missed it, he's a paraphrased condensed version in outline form, with the word count allotted to each topic indicated.   Brief comments will follow.

Introduction (85 words)

Thanks for inviting me.  

Context: Canada & U.S. Relations (246)

The U.S. is lucky to have Canada as our neighbors, friends and allies.

General Trade Relations Between U.S. & Canada (171)

Our economies are interdependent, and that's been good for both of us.

Main Topics (70) [outlines main body of speech]

We share (A) security (B) environmental (C) energy, and (D) trade [not mentioned in the intro] interests and concerns.
A. Security

1. Bilateral Security (229)

We'll continue efforts to secure our shared border and cooperate on planning together for emergencies.

2. Global Security (428)

Americans appreciated Canadian sympathy after 9/11. We realize Canada has suffered casualties in Afghanistan, and has rendered considerable financial aid in both Iraq and Afghanistan. I share the objection of many Canadians to GITMO and will close it. Going forward, I'll seek and welcome your advice on such issues.

B. Global Warming (238)

The planet faces "grave environmental dangers that global warming can bring."  As president, I will pursue a "sensible cap-and-trade emissions system" in common cause with Canada.

C. Energy (61)

The U.S. and Canada "stand much to gain by harmonizing our energy policies."

D. NAFTA (248)

As president, I will honor our NAFTA agreements, and work to strengthen and improve NAFTA. 
Close (210)

Our relationship has not always been smooth, but it's always been productive, based on good will and mutual admiration. And so it will continue. [End]


Nothing in this speech seems to represent anything new coming from McCain.  He wanted the Canadians to know that he accepts the premise of man-made global warming, doesn't share the Democrats bashing of NAFTA, and will be more solicitous of their opinions than has been the current administration (the meta-message in that instance).


One question: Just what is the U.S. energy policy that McCain proposes to "harmonize" with Canada? And how?


Since the audience wasn't made up of U.S. voters, McCain did not, and had no need to, differentiate himself from Barack Obama.  Or should he have?


Suggestion: Read the entire speech and ask yourself: How much of this speech could not have been delivered by Obama?