Another key Dem uninterested in being Obama's VP

Former Virginia governor Mark Warner has ruled himself out as Barack Obama's running mate. The AP reports:

Former Gov. Mark R. Warner on Saturday removed himself from consideration as a vice presidential running mate for Democrat Barack Obama.

Warner clarified his intentions for the first time as he accepted the Virginia Democratic Convention's nomination for a U.S. Senate race this fall.

"I have not sought and I will not accept any other opportunity," Warner told cheering convention delegates.

Virginia, Ohio, and Pennsylvania are considered key swing states which might be influenced by a home state veep- pick.

This is good news for McCain, just as was Ted Strickland,Ohio Governor saying he will not be a VP candidate either. The two strongest possible choices choices for Obama in terms of using he VP pick to win a red state --  Strickland of Ohio and Warner of Virginia -- are now out of contention.

Rick Moran comments:

"I find it interesting. If the pros thought Obama were a shoo in, they' leap at the chance. Either they're not very confident of an Obama win or they don't think much of serving with him."

Richard Baehr responds that it is more likely the latter: that they may believe their counsel would not be much sought by a President Obama.

Ed Lasky adds:

"Maybe they feel that Obama will increasingly come off as sounding radical-far left-which would rub off on them (particulary if he loses) and they have to run again."

Former Virginia governor Mark Warner has ruled himself out as Barack Obama's running mate. The AP reports:

Former Gov. Mark R. Warner on Saturday removed himself from consideration as a vice presidential running mate for Democrat Barack Obama.

Warner clarified his intentions for the first time as he accepted the Virginia Democratic Convention's nomination for a U.S. Senate race this fall.

"I have not sought and I will not accept any other opportunity," Warner told cheering convention delegates.

Virginia, Ohio, and Pennsylvania are considered key swing states which might be influenced by a home state veep- pick.

This is good news for McCain, just as was Ted Strickland,Ohio Governor saying he will not be a VP candidate either. The two strongest possible choices choices for Obama in terms of using he VP pick to win a red state --  Strickland of Ohio and Warner of Virginia -- are now out of contention.

Rick Moran comments:

"I find it interesting. If the pros thought Obama were a shoo in, they' leap at the chance. Either they're not very confident of an Obama win or they don't think much of serving with him."

Richard Baehr responds that it is more likely the latter: that they may believe their counsel would not be much sought by a President Obama.

Ed Lasky adds:

"Maybe they feel that Obama will increasingly come off as sounding radical-far left-which would rub off on them (particulary if he loses) and they have to run again."