Who wins if Bobby Jindal gets tapped for veep?

While many conservatives (like me) are excited at the prospect of Bobby Jindal appearing on the ticket with John McCain, back home in Louisiana all politics is still local. Governor Jindal has just began his first term as governor, with a massive reform agenda to implement, and many Louisianans do not want him to go. Opponents can’t wait to be rid of him, of course.
The New Orleans Times-Picayune’s blog Briefing Book took note  this way:


Even before word leaked out that Gov. Bobby Jindal would meet Friday with presumptive Republican presidential nominee John McCain, lawmakers enjoyed a few laughs Wednesday as they distributed bumper stickers reading "Jindal for V.P." Sen. Joe McPherson, D-Woodworth, took credit for the blue and white campaign paraphernalia. "You may question my motivation on this, but don't question my sincerity," McPherson said.

 

Meanwhile John Maginnis, of the website Louisiana Politics, thinks that one member of the notorious Landrieu clan of Democrats would benefit, while another would suffer:


 
In Louisiana, pride and excitement among conservatives over Jindal's potential vice-presidential nomination is tempered by the consequence of Gov. Mitch Landrieu for three years and possibly beyond. Some callers to radio talk shows have said it's not worth the trade.

As for the only Landrieu who will be on the fall ballot, Jindal next to the top of the GOP ticket poses the most serious threat yet to Sen. Mary Landrieu's re-election.

While she would benefit from the large African-American turnout that Obama would draw, Jindal for vice-president would cause a corresponding white conservative turnout for Republican Senate candidate John Kennedy to ride.
A governorship traded for a senate seat, it appears.

Hat tip: Elizabeth Weber Levy

While many conservatives (like me) are excited at the prospect of Bobby Jindal appearing on the ticket with John McCain, back home in Louisiana all politics is still local. Governor Jindal has just began his first term as governor, with a massive reform agenda to implement, and many Louisianans do not want him to go. Opponents can’t wait to be rid of him, of course.
The New Orleans Times-Picayune’s blog Briefing Book took note  this way:


Even before word leaked out that Gov. Bobby Jindal would meet Friday with presumptive Republican presidential nominee John McCain, lawmakers enjoyed a few laughs Wednesday as they distributed bumper stickers reading "Jindal for V.P." Sen. Joe McPherson, D-Woodworth, took credit for the blue and white campaign paraphernalia. "You may question my motivation on this, but don't question my sincerity," McPherson said.

 

Meanwhile John Maginnis, of the website Louisiana Politics, thinks that one member of the notorious Landrieu clan of Democrats would benefit, while another would suffer:


 
In Louisiana, pride and excitement among conservatives over Jindal's potential vice-presidential nomination is tempered by the consequence of Gov. Mitch Landrieu for three years and possibly beyond. Some callers to radio talk shows have said it's not worth the trade.

As for the only Landrieu who will be on the fall ballot, Jindal next to the top of the GOP ticket poses the most serious threat yet to Sen. Mary Landrieu's re-election.

While she would benefit from the large African-American turnout that Obama would draw, Jindal for vice-president would cause a corresponding white conservative turnout for Republican Senate candidate John Kennedy to ride.
A governorship traded for a senate seat, it appears.

Hat tip: Elizabeth Weber Levy