Senator Kennedy has Malignant Brain Tumor

Senator Ted Kennedy, a 40 year veteran in the senate, has been diagnosed with a malignant brain tumor.

The diagnosis comes after Kennedy's seizure in Hyannisport last weekend:

They said tests conducted after the seizure showed a tumor in Kennedy's left parietal lobe. Preliminary results from a biopsy of the brain identified the cause of the seizure as a malignant glioma, they said.

His treatment will be decided after more tests but the usual course includes combinations of radiation and chemotherapy.

Kennedy has been hospitalized in Boston since Saturday, when he was airlifted from Cape Cod after a seizure at his home.

"He has had no further seizures, remains in good overall condition, and is up and walking around the hospital," said the statement by Dr. Lee Schwamm, vice chairman of the Department of Neurology at Massachusetts General Hospital and Dr. Larry Ronan, Kennedy's primary care physician.

They said Kennedy will remain in the hospital "for the next couple of days according to routine protocol."

The cancer affects about 9,000 Americans a year and is the most common form of adult brain cancer. Prognosis depends on where the tumor is located and how soon it was caught but many patients live 5 years after treatment.
Kennedy has given no indication whether he will resign. Massachussets law calls for a special election within 145 days in the event of the death or resignation of a sitting senator.
Senator Ted Kennedy, a 40 year veteran in the senate, has been diagnosed with a malignant brain tumor.

The diagnosis comes after Kennedy's seizure in Hyannisport last weekend:

They said tests conducted after the seizure showed a tumor in Kennedy's left parietal lobe. Preliminary results from a biopsy of the brain identified the cause of the seizure as a malignant glioma, they said.

His treatment will be decided after more tests but the usual course includes combinations of radiation and chemotherapy.

Kennedy has been hospitalized in Boston since Saturday, when he was airlifted from Cape Cod after a seizure at his home.

"He has had no further seizures, remains in good overall condition, and is up and walking around the hospital," said the statement by Dr. Lee Schwamm, vice chairman of the Department of Neurology at Massachusetts General Hospital and Dr. Larry Ronan, Kennedy's primary care physician.

They said Kennedy will remain in the hospital "for the next couple of days according to routine protocol."

The cancer affects about 9,000 Americans a year and is the most common form of adult brain cancer. Prognosis depends on where the tumor is located and how soon it was caught but many patients live 5 years after treatment.
Kennedy has given no indication whether he will resign. Massachussets law calls for a special election within 145 days in the event of the death or resignation of a sitting senator.