Poll Predicts Hillary Landslide in West Virginia

Hillary Clinton is predicted to win the West Virginia primary tomorrow by a wide margin:

Although Barack Obama is the likely Democratic nominee, West Virginia Democratic voters are marching to a different drummer, as Hillary Clinton leads Obama by 36 points among likely University.

Sixty percent of voters polled preferred Clinton to Obama (24 percent). John Edwards, whose name remains on all West Virginia ballots, polled 4 percent, while 2 percent had no preference; 8 percent were undecided; and 2 percent refused a response.

Respondents said Clinton should stay in the primary fight and that she is not hurting the Democratic Party by staying in the race. Sixty-seven percent of likely Democratic voters said Clinton should stay in the race, regardless of what happens on Tuesday, and 24 percent said she should get out. Seventy-two percent said she is not hurting the Democratic Party by running in the remaining primaries, while 20 percent said she is doing the party harm.

Not that it really matters. Only something extremely damaging to Obama that came out between now and the convention could stop his ascension to the nomination.

But Clinton is pointing up Obama's weaknesses the longer she stays in. And with an expected huge victory next week in Kentucky, Clinton is going to remind Democrats that their candidate has enormous problems among some Democratic constituencies that could spell trouble in the fall.

Hillary Clinton is predicted to win the West Virginia primary tomorrow by a wide margin:

Although Barack Obama is the likely Democratic nominee, West Virginia Democratic voters are marching to a different drummer, as Hillary Clinton leads Obama by 36 points among likely University.

Sixty percent of voters polled preferred Clinton to Obama (24 percent). John Edwards, whose name remains on all West Virginia ballots, polled 4 percent, while 2 percent had no preference; 8 percent were undecided; and 2 percent refused a response.

Respondents said Clinton should stay in the primary fight and that she is not hurting the Democratic Party by staying in the race. Sixty-seven percent of likely Democratic voters said Clinton should stay in the race, regardless of what happens on Tuesday, and 24 percent said she should get out. Seventy-two percent said she is not hurting the Democratic Party by running in the remaining primaries, while 20 percent said she is doing the party harm.

Not that it really matters. Only something extremely damaging to Obama that came out between now and the convention could stop his ascension to the nomination.

But Clinton is pointing up Obama's weaknesses the longer she stays in. And with an expected huge victory next week in Kentucky, Clinton is going to remind Democrats that their candidate has enormous problems among some Democratic constituencies that could spell trouble in the fall.