Obama-Clinton in '08?

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Not very likely - especially since one of the jokes making the internet rounds is Obama better employ a food taster if he picks Hillary for Veep.

Obama is very angry at Clinton for a variety of sins. She apparently has failed to recognize the fact that he has had the nomination locked up for weeks. She has also, he feels, played the race card against him which he thinks is one of the reasons his numbers with white males has gone in the tank.

For Hillary's part, she can't believe this upstart rookie has actually taken The Prize away from her and prevented the Clintons from going back where they belong; the White House. Plus, she feels Obama's staffers have been disrespectful to her and the former president.

Ah, but the allure of power (or, in the case of the Vice President, the lure of making history) is a powerful balm that soothes all wounds and makes the impossible, possible.

George Stephanopolous:

CHARLES GIBSON: Is there any discussion of what kind of an exit strategy there would be?

GEORGE STEPHANOPOULOS: There are various exit strategies right now. Number one would be, go out on a win. So, stay in until West Virginia, where Sen. Clinton is likely the winner, and Kentucky on May 20, and after that, bow out. Two, negotiate for the imposition of Michigan and Florida, to get those delegations seated, declare victory on that, and get out. But the big one, Charlie - and this is what some people close to the Clintons are talking about: Is there a way to negotiate a settlement with Barack Obama to have Sen. Clinton on the ticket?

CHARLES GIBSON: And what do they think?
 
GEORGE STEPHANOPOULOS: It's hard to know. I mean, first of all, would Sen. Obama go for it? Can he get over the bitterness of this campaign? Can he be convinced that it's the strongest ticket? Third, of course, would Sen. Clinton take it? I think if it was offered in the right way, yes.

The only way Obama would take Clinton on the ticket is if it appeared he couldn't win without her. What Obama would love to have from Clinton is the obligatory picture at the convention, the two rivals together on stage,  their hands clasped and raised in unity.

He will probably get that picture. Once he is the nominee, there will be a tremendous effort to pull the two sides together. Expect prominent Clinton supporters to have prime time speaking slots during the convention. Some Clinton staffers may be given high profile positions in the Obama campaign. Everything that can be done to affect unity will be done.

Except bringing Hillary Clinton on board as Veep. That dog ain't huntin' unless Obama himself appears unelectable by convention time
.
Not very likely - especially since one of the jokes making the internet rounds is Obama better employ a food taster if he picks Hillary for Veep.

Obama is very angry at Clinton for a variety of sins. She apparently has failed to recognize the fact that he has had the nomination locked up for weeks. She has also, he feels, played the race card against him which he thinks is one of the reasons his numbers with white males has gone in the tank.

For Hillary's part, she can't believe this upstart rookie has actually taken The Prize away from her and prevented the Clintons from going back where they belong; the White House. Plus, she feels Obama's staffers have been disrespectful to her and the former president.

Ah, but the allure of power (or, in the case of the Vice President, the lure of making history) is a powerful balm that soothes all wounds and makes the impossible, possible.

George Stephanopolous:

CHARLES GIBSON: Is there any discussion of what kind of an exit strategy there would be?

GEORGE STEPHANOPOULOS: There are various exit strategies right now. Number one would be, go out on a win. So, stay in until West Virginia, where Sen. Clinton is likely the winner, and Kentucky on May 20, and after that, bow out. Two, negotiate for the imposition of Michigan and Florida, to get those delegations seated, declare victory on that, and get out. But the big one, Charlie - and this is what some people close to the Clintons are talking about: Is there a way to negotiate a settlement with Barack Obama to have Sen. Clinton on the ticket?

CHARLES GIBSON: And what do they think?
 
GEORGE STEPHANOPOULOS: It's hard to know. I mean, first of all, would Sen. Obama go for it? Can he get over the bitterness of this campaign? Can he be convinced that it's the strongest ticket? Third, of course, would Sen. Clinton take it? I think if it was offered in the right way, yes.

The only way Obama would take Clinton on the ticket is if it appeared he couldn't win without her. What Obama would love to have from Clinton is the obligatory picture at the convention, the two rivals together on stage,  their hands clasped and raised in unity.

He will probably get that picture. Once he is the nominee, there will be a tremendous effort to pull the two sides together. Expect prominent Clinton supporters to have prime time speaking slots during the convention. Some Clinton staffers may be given high profile positions in the Obama campaign. Everything that can be done to affect unity will be done.

Except bringing Hillary Clinton on board as Veep. That dog ain't huntin' unless Obama himself appears unelectable by convention time
.