McCain Campaign Cancels Bush Fundraiser

Ordinarily, even an unpopular president can pull in megabucks from his own party. But in a sign that President George Bush may not be much help to John McCain in his fundraising efforts, the campaign has cancelled a gala event at the Phoenix Convention Center due at least partially to a lack of ticket sales:

Sources familiar with the situation said the Bush-McCain event was not selling enough tickets to fill the Convention Center space, and that there were concerns about more anti-war protesters showing up outside the venue than attending the fundraiser inside.

Another source said there were concerns about the media covering the event.

Bush's Arizona fundraising effort for McCain is being moved to private residences in the Phoenix area. A White House official said the event was being moved because the McCain campaign prefers private fundraisers and it is Bush administration policy to have events in public venues open to the media. The White House official said to reconcile that the Tuesday event will be held at a private venue and not the Convention Center.

Convention Center personnel confirmed the event has been canceled at their venue.

Tickets to the event were to range from $1,000 to $25,000 for VIP treatment. Money was to go toward McCain's presidential bid and a number of Republican Party organs.

Already at a huge disadvantage money wise, the idea that McCain will not be able to rely on Bush to bring in huge amounts of money might be a real problem down the road. If the President can't rake in the cash in conservative Arizona, where would he be more successful?

With Obama's ability to raise $30-40 million a month, the GOP candidate is in danger of being absolutely swamped by the Democrat's money machine. Since McCain will almost certainly opt for federal financing, he will receive $80 million the day after the convention in September to run his entire campaign - infrastructure, travel, ad buys, and personnel. Obama may have twice that amount when all is said and done.

And in a close race, it may be the difference between victory and defeat.

Ordinarily, even an unpopular president can pull in megabucks from his own party. But in a sign that President George Bush may not be much help to John McCain in his fundraising efforts, the campaign has cancelled a gala event at the Phoenix Convention Center due at least partially to a lack of ticket sales:

Sources familiar with the situation said the Bush-McCain event was not selling enough tickets to fill the Convention Center space, and that there were concerns about more anti-war protesters showing up outside the venue than attending the fundraiser inside.

Another source said there were concerns about the media covering the event.

Bush's Arizona fundraising effort for McCain is being moved to private residences in the Phoenix area. A White House official said the event was being moved because the McCain campaign prefers private fundraisers and it is Bush administration policy to have events in public venues open to the media. The White House official said to reconcile that the Tuesday event will be held at a private venue and not the Convention Center.

Convention Center personnel confirmed the event has been canceled at their venue.

Tickets to the event were to range from $1,000 to $25,000 for VIP treatment. Money was to go toward McCain's presidential bid and a number of Republican Party organs.

Already at a huge disadvantage money wise, the idea that McCain will not be able to rely on Bush to bring in huge amounts of money might be a real problem down the road. If the President can't rake in the cash in conservative Arizona, where would he be more successful?

With Obama's ability to raise $30-40 million a month, the GOP candidate is in danger of being absolutely swamped by the Democrat's money machine. Since McCain will almost certainly opt for federal financing, he will receive $80 million the day after the convention in September to run his entire campaign - infrastructure, travel, ad buys, and personnel. Obama may have twice that amount when all is said and done.

And in a close race, it may be the difference between victory and defeat.