Hillary 'Pride of the Yankees'

Much fun was had at the expense of Hillary Rodham Clinton when she pulled her New York Yankee cap out of her carpetbag on route to the office of Senator from New York. Besides looking silly in cap and pantsuit, the Illinois native had long bragged about her love for the Chicago Cubs. And as with so much she has to say, the claim of her devotion to the Bronx Bombers was patently absurd.

Perhaps she can learn something from the history of the Yankees which may awaken her from fatuous arguments and dissuade her increasingly quixotic pursuit of the lost cause.

The Yankees lost the 1960 World Series in shocking and dramatic fashion. A bottom of the ninth home run by a Pittsburgh Pirate infielder, not previously known for power hitting, unexpectedly vanquished the heavily favored Yankees. Like Hillary, the Yankees were supposed to win.

The fact that over the course of the Series New York scored 57 runs to only 27 by the Pirates was interesting but of no consequence. Suggestion in the defeated Yankee locker room that they had of course won the Series due to better hitting, pitching, fielding, and scoring over the course of seven games would have no doubt resulted in scornful and derisive laughter if not, more likely, a belt in the mouth.

Much fun was had at the expense of Hillary Rodham Clinton when she pulled her New York Yankee cap out of her carpetbag on route to the office of Senator from New York. Besides looking silly in cap and pantsuit, the Illinois native had long bragged about her love for the Chicago Cubs. And as with so much she has to say, the claim of her devotion to the Bronx Bombers was patently absurd.

Perhaps she can learn something from the history of the Yankees which may awaken her from fatuous arguments and dissuade her increasingly quixotic pursuit of the lost cause.

The Yankees lost the 1960 World Series in shocking and dramatic fashion. A bottom of the ninth home run by a Pittsburgh Pirate infielder, not previously known for power hitting, unexpectedly vanquished the heavily favored Yankees. Like Hillary, the Yankees were supposed to win.

The fact that over the course of the Series New York scored 57 runs to only 27 by the Pirates was interesting but of no consequence. Suggestion in the defeated Yankee locker room that they had of course won the Series due to better hitting, pitching, fielding, and scoring over the course of seven games would have no doubt resulted in scornful and derisive laughter if not, more likely, a belt in the mouth.