Does Hillary Top the List for Veep?

Rick Moran
Not hardly. But in the end, many analysts say he will have no choice but to take her on as a running mate - especially if she plays her cards right.

Her all important exit from the race will probably determine her status as a running mate. And as Carl Bernstein points out in this CNN piece, it won't be because she goes softly into that goodnight:

A person close to her, with whom her campaign staff has counseled at various points, said this week, "I think the following will happen: Obama will be in a position where the party declares him the nominee by the first week in June. She'll still be fighting with everybody -- the Rules Committee, the party leaders -- and arguing, 'I'm winning these key states; I've got almost half the delegates. I have a whole constituency he hasn't reached. I've got real differences on approach to how we win this election, and I'm going to press the hell out of this guy. ... Relief for the middle class, universal health care, etc.; I'm Ms. Blue Collar, and I'm going to press my fight, because he can't win without my being on the ticket.' "

Another major Democratic Party figure, who supports her for president, agreed: "It's not going to be a quiet exit. ... Obama has got a terrible situation. He marches to a different drummer. He won't want to take her on the ticket. But he might have to, even though the idea of Vice President Hillary with Bill in the background at the White House is not something -- especially after what [the Clintons] have thrown at him that he relishes. I believe she'll go for it."

In short, if she keeps on doing what she is doing - winning primaries, racking up large majorities among white, blue collar voters, and generally scoring well in head to head polls with John McCain - she will almost end up on the ticket by default.

That's something that might prove very entertaining as Obama turns rhetorical handsprings to present Hillary Clinton as someone who is part of the "new politics" he so ardently proclaims. It will be hard to ignore the fact that Hillary is about as "new" in political terms as a chewed up, dog eared old slipper.

It will be a very tough sell.

Meanwhile, other candidates are emerging as consensus favorites among the talking heads and pundit class. Former Senator Sam Nunn from Georgia (to bloster Obama's pathetic national security credentials) or Governor Kaine of Virginia who could steal a few religious votes for him.

Then there are the two probables; Governor Strickland of Ohio, whose choice would make it extremely difficult for the GOP to hang on to that state, and Governo Kathleenr Sebelius - a proven blue vote getter in a very red state whose teaming with the first African American could make that ticket almost unbeatable in the fall.

But don't count Hillary Clinton out yet. After all, she has come back time and again during the primary season, proving that she is, if nothing else, a formidable opponent once she has her mind made up about achieving a goal.

Hat Tip: Ed Lasky
 
Not hardly. But in the end, many analysts say he will have no choice but to take her on as a running mate - especially if she plays her cards right.

Her all important exit from the race will probably determine her status as a running mate. And as Carl Bernstein points out in this CNN piece, it won't be because she goes softly into that goodnight:

A person close to her, with whom her campaign staff has counseled at various points, said this week, "I think the following will happen: Obama will be in a position where the party declares him the nominee by the first week in June. She'll still be fighting with everybody -- the Rules Committee, the party leaders -- and arguing, 'I'm winning these key states; I've got almost half the delegates. I have a whole constituency he hasn't reached. I've got real differences on approach to how we win this election, and I'm going to press the hell out of this guy. ... Relief for the middle class, universal health care, etc.; I'm Ms. Blue Collar, and I'm going to press my fight, because he can't win without my being on the ticket.' "

Another major Democratic Party figure, who supports her for president, agreed: "It's not going to be a quiet exit. ... Obama has got a terrible situation. He marches to a different drummer. He won't want to take her on the ticket. But he might have to, even though the idea of Vice President Hillary with Bill in the background at the White House is not something -- especially after what [the Clintons] have thrown at him that he relishes. I believe she'll go for it."

In short, if she keeps on doing what she is doing - winning primaries, racking up large majorities among white, blue collar voters, and generally scoring well in head to head polls with John McCain - she will almost end up on the ticket by default.

That's something that might prove very entertaining as Obama turns rhetorical handsprings to present Hillary Clinton as someone who is part of the "new politics" he so ardently proclaims. It will be hard to ignore the fact that Hillary is about as "new" in political terms as a chewed up, dog eared old slipper.

It will be a very tough sell.

Meanwhile, other candidates are emerging as consensus favorites among the talking heads and pundit class. Former Senator Sam Nunn from Georgia (to bloster Obama's pathetic national security credentials) or Governor Kaine of Virginia who could steal a few religious votes for him.

Then there are the two probables; Governor Strickland of Ohio, whose choice would make it extremely difficult for the GOP to hang on to that state, and Governo Kathleenr Sebelius - a proven blue vote getter in a very red state whose teaming with the first African American could make that ticket almost unbeatable in the fall.

But don't count Hillary Clinton out yet. After all, she has come back time and again during the primary season, proving that she is, if nothing else, a formidable opponent once she has her mind made up about achieving a goal.

Hat Tip: Ed Lasky