Will Obama's followers get disillusioned?

Ed Lasky
Barack Obama's foreign policy advisers are clearly hedging on his campaign promise to withdraw from Iraq -- a key plank of his platform, and a stance that propelled him into the hearts of the left wing of the Democratic Party and to delegate leadership in the Party's presidential race.

He seems to be bearing out the nature that Pastor Wright tells Bill Moyers about:

"He's a politician, I'm a pastor," he said. "We speak to two different audiences. And he says what he has to say as a politician. I say what I have to say as a pastor. But they're two different worlds"

More and more people realize that Barack Obama is just another politician, pandering for votes, changing his views to suit his political needs, cutting deals and cutting [visible] ties to people who reflect poorly on him. A new politics? Not quite.

Will his followers become disillusioned when they realize that Obama is just one in a long line of cynical politicians?
Barack Obama's foreign policy advisers are clearly hedging on his campaign promise to withdraw from Iraq -- a key plank of his platform, and a stance that propelled him into the hearts of the left wing of the Democratic Party and to delegate leadership in the Party's presidential race.

He seems to be bearing out the nature that Pastor Wright tells Bill Moyers about:

"He's a politician, I'm a pastor," he said. "We speak to two different audiences. And he says what he has to say as a politician. I say what I have to say as a pastor. But they're two different worlds"

More and more people realize that Barack Obama is just another politician, pandering for votes, changing his views to suit his political needs, cutting deals and cutting [visible] ties to people who reflect poorly on him. A new politics? Not quite.

Will his followers become disillusioned when they realize that Obama is just one in a long line of cynical politicians?