Fatah losing its grip in Lebanon

Thomas Lifson
Jonathan Schanzer, of the Jewish Policy Center, writes  about Fatah, the supposedly more "moderate" group claiming to represent the interests of Palestinians, losing support among the 400,000 Palestinians in Lebanon.
Palestinian Islamist groups attacked members of the Fatah faction in Lebanon's densely populated Ain al-Hilweh refugee camp in late March, the Lebanon Daily Star reports. The al-Qaeda-linked Jund al-Sham organization fired rockets on Fatah positions, resulting in four wounded Fatah fighters.

Lebanon had been a base of support for Fatah, as it provided social services, jobs and protection.

Last year, after the June coup that toppled Fatah and brought Hamas to power in Gaza, Lebanese Palestinians began to show outward signs of losing faith in Fatah. According to news reports, they had already grown restless with Fatah in the spring of 2007, when it was commonly believed that Fatah failed to protect the Palestinians of the Nahr al-Bared refugee camp during a raid by the Lebanese Army to oust the al-Qaeda affiliate group Fatah al-Islam. Fatah failed to exert political influence to restrain the invasion, and then failed to provide funds for reconstruction of destroyed property in the camp that it had promised to camp residents.

The position that Israel should negotiate with Fatah is getting more unrealistic with each day.

Jonathan Schanzer, of the Jewish Policy Center, writes  about Fatah, the supposedly more "moderate" group claiming to represent the interests of Palestinians, losing support among the 400,000 Palestinians in Lebanon.
Palestinian Islamist groups attacked members of the Fatah faction in Lebanon's densely populated Ain al-Hilweh refugee camp in late March, the Lebanon Daily Star reports. The al-Qaeda-linked Jund al-Sham organization fired rockets on Fatah positions, resulting in four wounded Fatah fighters.

Lebanon had been a base of support for Fatah, as it provided social services, jobs and protection.

Last year, after the June coup that toppled Fatah and brought Hamas to power in Gaza, Lebanese Palestinians began to show outward signs of losing faith in Fatah. According to news reports, they had already grown restless with Fatah in the spring of 2007, when it was commonly believed that Fatah failed to protect the Palestinians of the Nahr al-Bared refugee camp during a raid by the Lebanese Army to oust the al-Qaeda affiliate group Fatah al-Islam. Fatah failed to exert political influence to restrain the invasion, and then failed to provide funds for reconstruction of destroyed property in the camp that it had promised to camp residents.

The position that Israel should negotiate with Fatah is getting more unrealistic with each day.