Vatican lists 'ecological offenses' as new sins (Updated and Corrected)

Rick Moran
Ed Morrissey:

During Mass, Catholics will ask for forgiveness for their sins, for “what I have done, and what I have failed to do.” We call these sins of commission and sins of omission. Until today, I had never heard of sins of emission.
That about sums up the Vaticans "New forms of social sin" that will make it a transgression against God to pollute the earth:
Girotti, in an interview headlined "New Forms of Social Sin," also listed "ecological" offences as modern evils.

In recent months, Pope Benedict has made several strong appeals for the protection of the environment, saying issues such as climate change had become gravely important for the entire human race.

Under Benedict and his predecessor John Paul, the Vatican has become progressively "green." It has installed photovoltaic cells on buildings to produce electricity and hosted a scientific conference to discuss the ramifications of global warming and climate change, widely blamed on human use of fossil fuels.

Girotti, who is number two in the Vatican "Apostolic Penitentiary," which deals with matter of conscience, also listed drug trafficking and social and economic injustices as modern sins
I suppose the Vatican has a point since most deliberate pollution is also against the law. But it begs the question if eventually it will be sinful to drive or use a device that emits carbon dioxide. That kind of micro managing people's live is why so many Catholics have left the church.

But bureaucracies - even ones that deal with modern sin - must have something to show for all their work in order to prove they are worthy to exist. Finding new sins would seem to be as good a job as any to hold at a place like the Vatican.

Update and Correction:

AT contributor Selwyn Duke corrects the post above:

I must point out that it is based on one prelate's opinions rendered in an interview.  This no more reflects Church teaching than if he were to announce a belief that Ford made the best cars.  Unfortunately, individual prelates often do say stupid things.

No doubt. So let's chalk the above down to one man's opinion while still recognizing that since pollution is against the law, it's a pretty good bet it's a sin too - even if the Vatican hasn't gotten around to confirming it yet.




 
Ed Morrissey:

During Mass, Catholics will ask for forgiveness for their sins, for “what I have done, and what I have failed to do.” We call these sins of commission and sins of omission. Until today, I had never heard of sins of emission.
That about sums up the Vaticans "New forms of social sin" that will make it a transgression against God to pollute the earth:
Girotti, in an interview headlined "New Forms of Social Sin," also listed "ecological" offences as modern evils.

In recent months, Pope Benedict has made several strong appeals for the protection of the environment, saying issues such as climate change had become gravely important for the entire human race.

Under Benedict and his predecessor John Paul, the Vatican has become progressively "green." It has installed photovoltaic cells on buildings to produce electricity and hosted a scientific conference to discuss the ramifications of global warming and climate change, widely blamed on human use of fossil fuels.

Girotti, who is number two in the Vatican "Apostolic Penitentiary," which deals with matter of conscience, also listed drug trafficking and social and economic injustices as modern sins
I suppose the Vatican has a point since most deliberate pollution is also against the law. But it begs the question if eventually it will be sinful to drive or use a device that emits carbon dioxide. That kind of micro managing people's live is why so many Catholics have left the church.

But bureaucracies - even ones that deal with modern sin - must have something to show for all their work in order to prove they are worthy to exist. Finding new sins would seem to be as good a job as any to hold at a place like the Vatican.

Update and Correction:

AT contributor Selwyn Duke corrects the post above:

I must point out that it is based on one prelate's opinions rendered in an interview.  This no more reflects Church teaching than if he were to announce a belief that Ford made the best cars.  Unfortunately, individual prelates often do say stupid things.

No doubt. So let's chalk the above down to one man's opinion while still recognizing that since pollution is against the law, it's a pretty good bet it's a sin too - even if the Vatican hasn't gotten around to confirming it yet.