Spitzer Resigns

No surprise although one wonders what went on behind the scenes that brought this about:

Gov. Eliot Spitzer announced Wednesday that he is resigning, completing a spectacular fall from power for a politician whose once-promising career imploded amid allegations that he paid thousands of dollars for high-end prostitutes.

"I look at my time as governor with a sense of what might have been," Spitzer said, with his expressionless wife Silda standing at his side. "There is much more to be done, and I cannot allow my private failings to disrupt the people's work."

Spitzer says his resignation is effective Monday. He will be replaced by Lt. Gov. David Paterson, who will become New York's first black governor.
One wonders if this observation was completely necessary:
Spitzer was more composed than he was at his appearance two days ago, when he looked pale, drawn and glassy-eyed. The couple stood quietly Wednesday, inches apart; they never touched as they entered or left the room.

His wife took deep breaths as hundreds of photos were taken at close range. Each of Spitzer's words was accompanied by a rush of camera clicks.

"There is much more to be done, and I cannot allow my private failings to disrupt the people's work," he said.
I suppose moments like that are part of the deal for a political wife. She stands next to him on the victory platform, basking in the glow of his success and is also forced to endure moments like Silda was forced into today.

But I think we could have dispensed with the marriage analysis and not made any significance of the fact that the couple "never touched" while in view of the cameras. That's rank sensationalism and should have no place at a respectable news organization.

Then again, we're talking about the Associated Press. So much for "respectable" news.
No surprise although one wonders what went on behind the scenes that brought this about:

Gov. Eliot Spitzer announced Wednesday that he is resigning, completing a spectacular fall from power for a politician whose once-promising career imploded amid allegations that he paid thousands of dollars for high-end prostitutes.

"I look at my time as governor with a sense of what might have been," Spitzer said, with his expressionless wife Silda standing at his side. "There is much more to be done, and I cannot allow my private failings to disrupt the people's work."

Spitzer says his resignation is effective Monday. He will be replaced by Lt. Gov. David Paterson, who will become New York's first black governor.
One wonders if this observation was completely necessary:
Spitzer was more composed than he was at his appearance two days ago, when he looked pale, drawn and glassy-eyed. The couple stood quietly Wednesday, inches apart; they never touched as they entered or left the room.

His wife took deep breaths as hundreds of photos were taken at close range. Each of Spitzer's words was accompanied by a rush of camera clicks.

"There is much more to be done, and I cannot allow my private failings to disrupt the people's work," he said.
I suppose moments like that are part of the deal for a political wife. She stands next to him on the victory platform, basking in the glow of his success and is also forced to endure moments like Silda was forced into today.

But I think we could have dispensed with the marriage analysis and not made any significance of the fact that the couple "never touched" while in view of the cameras. That's rank sensationalism and should have no place at a respectable news organization.

Then again, we're talking about the Associated Press. So much for "respectable" news.