See Fit to See 'Fitna' Now

Fitna, the film short that Islamists and their western cheer-leaders worked so hard to hide, is now playing.

Catch it while you can. 

While not quite a fountain of revelation, especially to AT readers, it does a nice job of linking passages of the Koran to anti-Western Islamic hate speech and on to violence and specific acts of terror. And then builds to a crescendo that peaks by imploring Muslims "to tear the spiteful verses" from their holy book.

But perhaps overshadowing its vital message, the Thursday worldwide release represents a major victory against the cowards and PC brain police who strived to bury it.

Just last week, American internet hosting service Network Solutions yanked Dutch director Geert Wilders' Web site FitnaTheMovie.com - which was to premiere the movie -- citing violations to the company's "hate speech" policies.

Hate speech my eye.

And Dutch Prime Minister Jan Peter Balkenende loudly condemned its release, actually complaining -- with a straight face mind you -- that it "wrongly equated Islam with violence," adding that:

"We believe it serves no purpose other than to offend."

No other purpose? Did Revere's famous ride serve no purpose other than to offend the British?

Perhaps leading a country particularly impacted by the runaway Islamic population explosion in Europe -- and depicted in the film -- has politically skewed his judgment.

Or maybe the PM is just scared stupid.

Another issue Fitna addresses is the grisly 2004 murder of film director Theo Van Gogh by a nut-job who pinned a note calling for Islamic jihad against infidels to the corpse.  As both Wilders' and Van Gogh's films take on Islam, the death threats received by the former are neither particularly astonishing nor likely lost on the spineless Balkenende.

Of course he's hardly alone.  Virtually every Dutch TV station refused to air the short, and easily intimidated dhimmis-to-be worldwide are no doubt all wondering the same thing:

Will the film's release prompt the same rational response from its subjects that we've come to expect from the "religion of peace?" 

Does Osama wear a funny hat?

As of this morning there have been protests in Iran, Pakistan and Indonesia calling for the "blasphemous" flick to go dark worldwide.  Fasten your seatbelts.

You can see what they don't want you to see and why they don't want you to see it.  

Now.
Fitna, the film short that Islamists and their western cheer-leaders worked so hard to hide, is now playing.

Catch it while you can. 

While not quite a fountain of revelation, especially to AT readers, it does a nice job of linking passages of the Koran to anti-Western Islamic hate speech and on to violence and specific acts of terror. And then builds to a crescendo that peaks by imploring Muslims "to tear the spiteful verses" from their holy book.

But perhaps overshadowing its vital message, the Thursday worldwide release represents a major victory against the cowards and PC brain police who strived to bury it.

Just last week, American internet hosting service Network Solutions yanked Dutch director Geert Wilders' Web site FitnaTheMovie.com - which was to premiere the movie -- citing violations to the company's "hate speech" policies.

Hate speech my eye.

And Dutch Prime Minister Jan Peter Balkenende loudly condemned its release, actually complaining -- with a straight face mind you -- that it "wrongly equated Islam with violence," adding that:

"We believe it serves no purpose other than to offend."

No other purpose? Did Revere's famous ride serve no purpose other than to offend the British?

Perhaps leading a country particularly impacted by the runaway Islamic population explosion in Europe -- and depicted in the film -- has politically skewed his judgment.

Or maybe the PM is just scared stupid.

Another issue Fitna addresses is the grisly 2004 murder of film director Theo Van Gogh by a nut-job who pinned a note calling for Islamic jihad against infidels to the corpse.  As both Wilders' and Van Gogh's films take on Islam, the death threats received by the former are neither particularly astonishing nor likely lost on the spineless Balkenende.

Of course he's hardly alone.  Virtually every Dutch TV station refused to air the short, and easily intimidated dhimmis-to-be worldwide are no doubt all wondering the same thing:

Will the film's release prompt the same rational response from its subjects that we've come to expect from the "religion of peace?" 

Does Osama wear a funny hat?

As of this morning there have been protests in Iran, Pakistan and Indonesia calling for the "blasphemous" flick to go dark worldwide.  Fasten your seatbelts.

You can see what they don't want you to see and why they don't want you to see it.  

Now.