Obama Takes Wyoming Caucuses by R. Moran

Rick Moran
There weren't that many delegates at stake in Wyoming but Hillary Clinton made a late effort any way to see if she could keep the momentum going from her victories last Tuesday:

She couldn't:

Senator Barack Obama chalked up a victory in another caucus state on Saturday, beating Senator Hillary Rodham Clinton in Wyoming by a wide margin.

The victory, while in a state with only 18 delegates, was welcome news for the Obama campaign as it sought to blunt any advantage Mrs. Clinton might gain from her victories in Ohio and Texas on Tuesday.
 
Mrs. Clinton campaigned here Friday, a day after her husband and daughter, signaling the stakes every contest holds in the fierce battle for the Democratic nomination.

Party officials reported extremely high turnout at caucus sites across the state. In Laramie County, more than 1,500 came to cast votes at the caucus site, quickly filling the auditorium in downtown Cheyenne. Hundreds waited outside for hours until they could enter and vote. (In 2004, only 160 people showed up for the Laramie County caucus.)
It appears that Obama will gain 7 delegates while Hillary Clinton will get 5. The remainder will be chosen at a statewide convention later this spring.

Once again, Obama's superior organizing proves that he can win caucuses. But it hardly helps his case with Super Delegates who he must convince if he is to prevail at the convention.
There weren't that many delegates at stake in Wyoming but Hillary Clinton made a late effort any way to see if she could keep the momentum going from her victories last Tuesday:

She couldn't:

Senator Barack Obama chalked up a victory in another caucus state on Saturday, beating Senator Hillary Rodham Clinton in Wyoming by a wide margin.

The victory, while in a state with only 18 delegates, was welcome news for the Obama campaign as it sought to blunt any advantage Mrs. Clinton might gain from her victories in Ohio and Texas on Tuesday.
 
Mrs. Clinton campaigned here Friday, a day after her husband and daughter, signaling the stakes every contest holds in the fierce battle for the Democratic nomination.

Party officials reported extremely high turnout at caucus sites across the state. In Laramie County, more than 1,500 came to cast votes at the caucus site, quickly filling the auditorium in downtown Cheyenne. Hundreds waited outside for hours until they could enter and vote. (In 2004, only 160 people showed up for the Laramie County caucus.)
It appears that Obama will gain 7 delegates while Hillary Clinton will get 5. The remainder will be chosen at a statewide convention later this spring.

Once again, Obama's superior organizing proves that he can win caucuses. But it hardly helps his case with Super Delegates who he must convince if he is to prevail at the convention.