Religious coexistence with Islam

The UK Times asks, and then two days later seems to answer negatively the question: "Does Islam fit with our law? 

Two days ago, Ian Edge and Robin Griffiths-Jones (respectively, director of Centre of Islamic and Middle East Law (CIMEL) at the School of Oriental and African Studies in the University of London and Master of the Temple at the Temple Church) write hopefully:

We too readily imagine two incompatible and impermeable systems of law squared up for conflict with each other. But it is a matter of genuine disagreement how wide or deep is the gulf between the two systems - and both are evolving.

Faced with a large and growing population of Muslims, it is understandable that some middle ground be found. But today, the Times carries a story  that cannot be construed as offering encouragement.

A 37-year-old American businesswoman and married mother of three is seeking justice after she was thrown in jail by Saudi Arabia's religious police for sitting with a male colleague at a Starbucks coffee shop in Riyadh.

Yara, who does not want her last name published for fear of retribution, was bruised and crying when she was freed from a day in prison after she was strip-searched, threatened and forced to sign false confessions by the Kingdom's "Mutaween" police.

It is worthwhile pursuing peaceful coexistence. But it takes two sides to compromise.

Hat tip: Joseph Crowley

The UK Times asks, and then two days later seems to answer negatively the question: "Does Islam fit with our law? 

Two days ago, Ian Edge and Robin Griffiths-Jones (respectively, director of Centre of Islamic and Middle East Law (CIMEL) at the School of Oriental and African Studies in the University of London and Master of the Temple at the Temple Church) write hopefully:

We too readily imagine two incompatible and impermeable systems of law squared up for conflict with each other. But it is a matter of genuine disagreement how wide or deep is the gulf between the two systems - and both are evolving.

Faced with a large and growing population of Muslims, it is understandable that some middle ground be found. But today, the Times carries a story  that cannot be construed as offering encouragement.

A 37-year-old American businesswoman and married mother of three is seeking justice after she was thrown in jail by Saudi Arabia's religious police for sitting with a male colleague at a Starbucks coffee shop in Riyadh.

Yara, who does not want her last name published for fear of retribution, was bruised and crying when she was freed from a day in prison after she was strip-searched, threatened and forced to sign false confessions by the Kingdom's "Mutaween" police.

It is worthwhile pursuing peaceful coexistence. But it takes two sides to compromise.

Hat tip: Joseph Crowley