Politicized Science

An editorial in the February 1 issue of Science, the flagship publication of the American Association for the Advancement of Science, begins as follows:

We in the United States are sliding down a ramp that will take us, in just 4 days, to the much anticipated "Super Tuesday" in the presidential nomination cycle...

The editor of the premier science journal in the world has been watching the debates "in alternating stages of boredom and disbelief," embarrassed that they are not conducted in the "stately" manner of "other" unspecified "nations."

What particularly galls the galling editor of this galling magazine is that none of the debates are exclusively devoted to scientific issues, though in fact, given the expansive definition of science employed by left-wing scientists, the debates have been about nothing but science.

And who should broadcast such a debate?  The Public Broadcasting Service.

Who has endorsed the project?  Congressman Bart Gordon, Democrat of Tennessee.

What questions might be asked?  National Public Radio has a list.

Who should moderate it?  A "public figure with a serious interest in science and science policy."

Who might that be?  Alan Alda!

An editorial in the February 1 issue of Science, the flagship publication of the American Association for the Advancement of Science, begins as follows:

We in the United States are sliding down a ramp that will take us, in just 4 days, to the much anticipated "Super Tuesday" in the presidential nomination cycle...

The editor of the premier science journal in the world has been watching the debates "in alternating stages of boredom and disbelief," embarrassed that they are not conducted in the "stately" manner of "other" unspecified "nations."

What particularly galls the galling editor of this galling magazine is that none of the debates are exclusively devoted to scientific issues, though in fact, given the expansive definition of science employed by left-wing scientists, the debates have been about nothing but science.

And who should broadcast such a debate?  The Public Broadcasting Service.

Who has endorsed the project?  Congressman Bart Gordon, Democrat of Tennessee.

What questions might be asked?  National Public Radio has a list.

Who should moderate it?  A "public figure with a serious interest in science and science policy."

Who might that be?  Alan Alda!