McCain's speech to CPAC

Thomas Lifson
John McCain hit many of the notes I suggested this morning, and seems to have won over the balance of   the CPAC crowd's verbally expressed opinion. There was a brief moment of booing when he raised the topic of immigration, but after a few seconds of scattered boos, cheering began and then supplanted, growing as the seconds went by. The crowd had been previously cautioned to eschew booing, and the cheers steadily grew.

From that point on, those with negative opinions kept their own counsel, while the percentage of the crowd cheering appeared to grow. One could say that the audible evidence suggests McCain won over the crowd.

He stressed many shared conservative values he pledges to fight for. National defense was presented as a consequential choice facing to country. He predicted a humanitarian disaster in Iraq, should either Democrat be nominated and follow through on promises of prompt withdrawal.

Along with general principles like liberty and fiscal discipline he promised to veto any legislation with earmarks, and to fight to make permanent the Bush tax cuts and work for further tax cuts.

He ended by noting that he was specifically asking for the support of conservatives. It is important to ask, and he did it gracefully and prominently.

With almost nine months to go, and McCain getting off to a good start, there is time for the party to unify in the name of defeating the Democrat. 

John McCain hit many of the notes I suggested this morning, and seems to have won over the balance of   the CPAC crowd's verbally expressed opinion. There was a brief moment of booing when he raised the topic of immigration, but after a few seconds of scattered boos, cheering began and then supplanted, growing as the seconds went by. The crowd had been previously cautioned to eschew booing, and the cheers steadily grew.

From that point on, those with negative opinions kept their own counsel, while the percentage of the crowd cheering appeared to grow. One could say that the audible evidence suggests McCain won over the crowd.

He stressed many shared conservative values he pledges to fight for. National defense was presented as a consequential choice facing to country. He predicted a humanitarian disaster in Iraq, should either Democrat be nominated and follow through on promises of prompt withdrawal.

Along with general principles like liberty and fiscal discipline he promised to veto any legislation with earmarks, and to fight to make permanent the Bush tax cuts and work for further tax cuts.

He ended by noting that he was specifically asking for the support of conservatives. It is important to ask, and he did it gracefully and prominently.

With almost nine months to go, and McCain getting off to a good start, there is time for the party to unify in the name of defeating the Democrat.