Cuban Parliament Selects new leader today

Rick Moran
Although Fidel Castro's brother is considered to have the inside track to the presidency, the Parliament may opt to seat a younger candidate according to the BBC:


But Cuba could opt for a member of a younger generation of politicians, says the BBC's Michael Voss in Havana.

These include Vice-President Carlos Lage, 56, or Foreign Minister Felipe Perez Roque, 42.

Whoever takes over will have to steer the Caribbean island through un-charted waters in an unpredictable period of economic and political renewal, our correspondent adds.
Then again, this could be a continuation of the BBC's shameless promotion of the communist regime in Cuba to speculate that Raul Castro would so easily give up power and allow a subordinate to replace him. The younger Castro has the army and the communist party apparatchiks behind him. Why should be voluntarily step aside? The BBC is mum on that issue.

It is doubtful any "reforms" made by Castro or anyone else will be meaningful enough to revive the Cuban economy. For that to occur, a real revolution would have to happen. And Cuba is nowhere near ready for that.
Although Fidel Castro's brother is considered to have the inside track to the presidency, the Parliament may opt to seat a younger candidate according to the BBC:


But Cuba could opt for a member of a younger generation of politicians, says the BBC's Michael Voss in Havana.

These include Vice-President Carlos Lage, 56, or Foreign Minister Felipe Perez Roque, 42.

Whoever takes over will have to steer the Caribbean island through un-charted waters in an unpredictable period of economic and political renewal, our correspondent adds.
Then again, this could be a continuation of the BBC's shameless promotion of the communist regime in Cuba to speculate that Raul Castro would so easily give up power and allow a subordinate to replace him. The younger Castro has the army and the communist party apparatchiks behind him. Why should be voluntarily step aside? The BBC is mum on that issue.

It is doubtful any "reforms" made by Castro or anyone else will be meaningful enough to revive the Cuban economy. For that to occur, a real revolution would have to happen. And Cuba is nowhere near ready for that.