Conservatives still fear a McCain presidency

Despite John McCain's heartfelt, even humble speech before conservative activists at the CPAC conference, many on the right remain unconvinced that a McCain presidency would be anything short of a disaster.

Case in point: This piece in Congressional Quarterly foresees a McCain presidency based on his past actions:


McCain is not someone who simply reaches across the aisle to form coalitions with the other side. He walks across the aisle, puts on the other team’s uniform and sings the other team’s fight song.
And I might add in so doing, he uses the same language to criticize conservatives and Republicans as his friends in the Democratic party. He likened opposition to his immigration reform package as racist and uninformed. Many proponents of border security first have never forgiven him.

Add to that, the senator's intemperate personality as described by this Hill staffer:

John McCain is the presumptive nominee of the Republican Party. That is unfortunate, and I am sad to say that I cannot support him – as is the case with many people I know – for many of the reasons explored repeatedly on NRO and other places. As a Hill staffer, those of you who share my view and I know what is at stake – at least as much as anyone… from the confirmation of judges to the War on Terror and beyond. But, as a Hill staffer, many of us find him to be a petty, often vindictive man who treats people – from Senators to junior female staffers – disrespectfully and, frankly, without the manners appropriate for a Senator, much less a President.

His votes and stances are a matter of record and have been fully explored in many places. But we, as Hill staffers, have seen his personal vitriol up close and personally. Whether it has been personal confrontations with Senators or his cussing out of and demeaning comments toward staffers – whether it was his arrogance and dismissal of concerned conservatives displayed during the “Gang of 14” or his or his staff’s constant, repeated – often vindictive and very personal – undermining of conservative principles in the immigration debate – John McCain has proven time and time again that his worthiness to lead our Party, much less our nation, is more than questionable. (Via Michelle Malkin)
This staffer is not the first person to comment on McCain's ill-tempered personality. It is one thing to fight for what you believe with passion. It is quite another to treat the people around you with such contempt when fighting for your beliefs.

It is not a question of winning a popularity contest. It is the measure of a leader to keep control of one's emotions - especially in a crisis. John McCain fails this test and his treatment of colleagues and staffers should give everyone pause when considering whether to vote for him or not.
 
Despite John McCain's heartfelt, even humble speech before conservative activists at the CPAC conference, many on the right remain unconvinced that a McCain presidency would be anything short of a disaster.

Case in point: This piece in Congressional Quarterly foresees a McCain presidency based on his past actions:


McCain is not someone who simply reaches across the aisle to form coalitions with the other side. He walks across the aisle, puts on the other team’s uniform and sings the other team’s fight song.
And I might add in so doing, he uses the same language to criticize conservatives and Republicans as his friends in the Democratic party. He likened opposition to his immigration reform package as racist and uninformed. Many proponents of border security first have never forgiven him.

Add to that, the senator's intemperate personality as described by this Hill staffer:

John McCain is the presumptive nominee of the Republican Party. That is unfortunate, and I am sad to say that I cannot support him – as is the case with many people I know – for many of the reasons explored repeatedly on NRO and other places. As a Hill staffer, those of you who share my view and I know what is at stake – at least as much as anyone… from the confirmation of judges to the War on Terror and beyond. But, as a Hill staffer, many of us find him to be a petty, often vindictive man who treats people – from Senators to junior female staffers – disrespectfully and, frankly, without the manners appropriate for a Senator, much less a President.

His votes and stances are a matter of record and have been fully explored in many places. But we, as Hill staffers, have seen his personal vitriol up close and personally. Whether it has been personal confrontations with Senators or his cussing out of and demeaning comments toward staffers – whether it was his arrogance and dismissal of concerned conservatives displayed during the “Gang of 14” or his or his staff’s constant, repeated – often vindictive and very personal – undermining of conservative principles in the immigration debate – John McCain has proven time and time again that his worthiness to lead our Party, much less our nation, is more than questionable. (Via Michelle Malkin)
This staffer is not the first person to comment on McCain's ill-tempered personality. It is one thing to fight for what you believe with passion. It is quite another to treat the people around you with such contempt when fighting for your beliefs.

It is not a question of winning a popularity contest. It is the measure of a leader to keep control of one's emotions - especially in a crisis. John McCain fails this test and his treatment of colleagues and staffers should give everyone pause when considering whether to vote for him or not.