All in the family at the Washington Post

Thomas Lifson
The Washington Post has a new publisher, a dynamic, intelligent, and comparatively young (41) lawyer. Did I mention that she is the granddaughter of legendary former CEO Katharine Graham, niece of current CEO Donald Graham, and the great-granddaughter of Eugene Meyer, the financier who purchased and turned around the then-bankrupt newspaper in 1933? Katharine Weymouth is in fact the fifth generation of family to hold the title of publisher.

Looking at how well the rival New York Times has done under Punch Sulzberger, the son and grandson of former publishers of that paper, shareholders may blanch. But family stewardship of the Washington Post Company has so far been far more benign than the decline and fall experienced by the New York Times Company under the leadership of Pinch Sulzberger.

Both the Times and Post are, of course, decidedly liberal publications, dedicated to the common man. Except, of course, when family members want privileges in their publicly-held corporate empires.

Editor & Publisher's account of the matter waited five full paragraphs in discussing the appointment of Ms. Weymouth to reveal the family angle. If Exxon, Wal-Mart, or another liberal hate-object firm practiced similar nepotism, does anyone imagine it would take five paragraphs to inform readers?

Hat tip: David Paulin
The Washington Post has a new publisher, a dynamic, intelligent, and comparatively young (41) lawyer. Did I mention that she is the granddaughter of legendary former CEO Katharine Graham, niece of current CEO Donald Graham, and the great-granddaughter of Eugene Meyer, the financier who purchased and turned around the then-bankrupt newspaper in 1933? Katharine Weymouth is in fact the fifth generation of family to hold the title of publisher.

Looking at how well the rival New York Times has done under Punch Sulzberger, the son and grandson of former publishers of that paper, shareholders may blanch. But family stewardship of the Washington Post Company has so far been far more benign than the decline and fall experienced by the New York Times Company under the leadership of Pinch Sulzberger.

Both the Times and Post are, of course, decidedly liberal publications, dedicated to the common man. Except, of course, when family members want privileges in their publicly-held corporate empires.

Editor & Publisher's account of the matter waited five full paragraphs in discussing the appointment of Ms. Weymouth to reveal the family angle. If Exxon, Wal-Mart, or another liberal hate-object firm practiced similar nepotism, does anyone imagine it would take five paragraphs to inform readers?

Hat tip: David Paulin